Why is the sky.... purple?

In this case, by ‘sky’ I mean outer space. Tell me forum goers, look outside your window and tell me what colour the night sky is.

Black? Dark?

So why in the hell would Sabre make space all lit up like a cotton candy machine? I’m talking about the opening cutscene. It looks shocking. Purple? Eh.

I really really hope that 343 doesn’t decide to make space, of all things, visually inconsistent in future titles.

What annoyed you about Halo CEA, visually?

Something to do with the gasses given off of the other planets. Learned it in 3rd grade.

No.

> No.

If not then I don’t know why, I think it is kinda ridiculous.

pretty sure he’s right… but I’m 99% sure that deep outer space has different colors and stuff like that, I mean you have seen all these space wallpapers right? Just look at the Waypoint background… does that look pitch black to you?

How do you know what space looks like 2 billion light years away looks like?

> No.

Don’t break your brain coming up with a reason “why” either.

Take into account - This isn’t earth’s orbit. Many things can cause a visual disorientation/impairment in a vacuum.

Secondly, this is science fiction. It’s not “real”.

considering the universe is equal in every direction, what we know space looks like near us is what space looks like everywhere. now if your on a different planet and you look up into the sky, the colour depends on the mixture of gasses in the atmosphere, how far away the sun is and what type of star it is.

just look at Nebulae and Stars, they give off their own colours.

In Evolutions, you learn that Admiral Cole always wanted to live under a set of stars he didn’t reconize. Which means that the sky doesn’t look the same everywhere. Alpha Halo could have been very close to some Nebulas, where stars form. These are very colorful and amazing. Also, stars are different colors. So, we could just be in a part of the galaxy where a lot of stars are “purple”.

Lets keep this answer simple…

Someone decided that the color purple best fit the overall look of that particular scene.
I do understand that this bothers you, I do. The reason why, I do not and probably never will.

Here’s a good question, why do people over analyze everything?

> Something to do with the gasses given off of the other planets. Learned it in 3rd grade.

You are correct. Link here:
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2010/13/image/a/

Gases are attributed to the different colors and what looks like the color blue(purple may also be associated)is the color given from the glow of oxygen.

If I really, really have to gripe, I’ll say that (the new) Master Chief’s legs look a little small for his body. :stuck_out_tongue:

Not all planets share the same atmospheric gases, which produce the haze in our skies.

> How do you know what space looks like 2 billion light years away looks like?

You mean 10.5 Light Years?

> considering the universe is equal in every direction, what we know space looks like near us is what space looks like everywhere. now if your on a different planet and you look up into the sky, the colour depends on the mixture of gasses in the atmosphere, how far away the sun is and what type of star it is.

Well yes, that’s the basic understanding of space considering it’s nothing. Well, not nothing, but made of things we can’t comprehend, and are too small to study. The only reason why Space would have color is from the gaseous released from planets (most likely gas giants, most gaseous would free float too far away to be visible).

> Not all planets share the same atmospheric gases, which produce the haze in our skies.

The color of our sky at night is based on the fact that the atmosphere is picking up little to no sunlight, this gives us what appears to be a pitch black night sky. However, as the sun approaches the horizon, the sky begins to change color (even occasionally to a shade of near purple) because of how our atmosphere refracts and reflects the sun’s light and radiation. Now with Halo, you have to take two things into account. 1. Halo doesn’t have a Spherical Atmosphere, but rather a custom shaped one to protect its habitable areas, this can play hell on light effects. And 2. Halo sits in an orbital balance between the Gas Giant Threshold (something Earth has no equivalent to in our immediate area) and Threshold’s moon Basis, which also bounce light to Halo that has picked up color elements from both the planet and the moon.

> The color of our sky at night is based on the fact that the atmosphere is picking up little to no sunlight, this gives us what appears to be a pitch black night sky. However, as the sun approaches the horizon, the sky begins to change color (even occasionally to a shade of near purple) because of how our atmosphere refracts and reflects the sun’s light and radiation. Now with Halo, you have to take two things into account. 1. Halo doesn’t have a Spherical Atmosphere, but rather a custom shaped one to protect its habitable areas, this can play hell on light effects. And 2. Halo sits in an orbital balance between the Gas Giant Threshold (something Earth has no equivalent to in our immediate area) and Threshold’s moon Basis, which also bounce light to Halo that has picked up color elements from both the planet and the moon.

>Didn’t read post

But that’s okay.

Now, you can clearly see the centre of our galaxy (The milky Way) in the opening cutscene. Everything around the ship in all directions is purple. For the effect to be caused by a nebula/gas cloud/something, it would be restricted to an area of the skybox and not consistent all around.

If you’re thinking that they were actually in the nebula or something keep in mind that they’re quite hot.

A nebula. Notice that dark areas present around it. Space is dark.

Space isn’t lit up like a Christmas tree. At least not on the scale that’s present in the cutscene. This was purely an aesthetic decision that I can’t begin to make sense of.

> > The color of our sky at night is based on the fact that the atmosphere is picking up little to no sunlight, this gives us what appears to be a pitch black night sky. However, as the sun approaches the horizon, the sky begins to change color (even occasionally to a shade of near purple) because of how our atmosphere refracts and reflects the sun’s light and radiation. Now with Halo, you have to take two things into account. 1. Halo doesn’t have a Spherical Atmosphere, but rather a custom shaped one to protect its habitable areas, this can play hell on light effects. And 2. Halo sits in an orbital balance between the Gas Giant Threshold (something Earth has no equivalent to in our immediate area) and Threshold’s moon Basis, which also bounce light to Halo that has picked up color elements from both the planet and the moon.
>
> >Didn’t read post
>
> But that’s okay.
>
> Now, you can clearly see the centre of our galaxy (The milky Way) in the opening cutscene. Everything around the ship in all directions is purple. For the effect to be caused by a nebula/gas cloud/something, it would be restricted to an area of the skybox and not consistent all around.
>
> If you’re thinking that they were actually in the nebula or something keep in mind that they’re quite hot.
>
> A nebula. Notice that dark areas present around it. Space is dark.
>
> Space isn’t lit up like a Christmas tree. At least not on the scale that’s present in the cutscene. This was purely an aesthetic decision that I can’t begin to make sense of.

Well let’s not forget this is a complete science fiction story. The universe doesn’t necessarily have to coincide with our universes logistics in total.

It’s Bungie/343’s world. They can make the air liquid nitrogen if they so chose to. If people will accept it, then they will. Reach is a made up planet but it’s apparently in the Milky Way.

This is probably what 343/Saber was going for:

Would you rather have a black skybox with little white dots, or have a beautifully lit up skybox with an amazing variety of colors. I would go with the beautiful and creative skybox.