Why Do People Still Believe That Bloom Has Always Been In Halo?

I made this thread to make people stop believing this lie.
The aim of this thread is to make my fellow Reach gamers stop being so ignorant.
I won’t be bashing bloom and say that spread is better, or won’t be bashing spread and say that bloom is better, both could be soooooooooo good if implemented correctly.

First of all, the spread with the pistol of Halo CE and Halo PC were different from each other, the PC version actually let bullets go outside the reticle when you spammed, and not only when you held the trigger.

Bullet spread and bloom are not the same thing, please people don’t say that they’re the same thing because they are not.

The best example of bullet spread would be in the Halo 3 BR -> At long range you couldn’t control the randomness, and this is bad for compettive play, but if you only use the BR in close-medium range it won’t matter as much. Another example of spread is the CE and 3 AR, because <mark>you can’t control the randomness</mark>.

The best example of bloom is in the DMR (Q: in what other Halo were we encourage to pace our shots?) -> At long range randomness can be controled, but the killtime becomes slower, which is good and doesn’t promote randomness in long range. But the problem are the close-medium range battles, where spamming the trigger can beat pacing because the closer you’re the more effective spamming will be, this is bad for competitive play, and since 4 vs 4 is the mode which is considered the most competitive, the randomness of the DMR ruins the game the same way long range battles were ruined in Halo 3. Another example is the Reach AR, because were <mark>you can control the randomness</mark> when you’re shooting at longer ranges.

Can you see it now? Bloom and Spread are pretty much opposites, so why do people still claim that they are the same? White isn’t Black and an Apple isn’t an Orange. There was a good reason why bloom was lowered to make the DMR and Magnum more consistent.

Halo CE, 2, 3 and ODST used bullet spread (shots were always random depending on reticle size) with static reticles.

Reach uses bloom (shots go from accurate to inaccurate) with dynamic reticles.

Please, stop this “Halo has had bloom for over 10 years!” nonsense and have a good day.

The Coolest thing would be for Halo 4 to use static reticles and spread for close-medium range combat, and bloom for long range combat

Please I beg you, don’t link me to any Halo PC bloom videos, Thank You :smiley:

Here’s a cool site I found, It’s about 100% bloom vs 85% bloom.

<— The Reach forums are over there.

> <— The Reach forums are over there.

I just updated the thread, now this has something to do with Halo 4.

The only difference between “spread” and “bloom”, if that’s what they’re called, is that bloom is reflected visually, whereas spread is not.

> The only difference between “spread” and “bloom”, if that’s what they’re called, is that bloom is reflected visually, whereas spread is not.

Yes and no.

Yes to what you said and No to when you said that it was the only defference.

When there was spread you couldn’t control the randomness could you?

Shooting slower (with spread) only got me killed because me and my enemy are shooting with the same accuracy, but I am just shooting slower.

Actually, every fully-automatic weapon in Halo has had bloom.

But other than that, yeah.

And to the guy that basically said bloom and spread were the same, spread is the spreading of your shots within the stable reticle, bloom is the spread of your shots within the expanding reticle (sometimes even outside) the faster you shoot.

> When there was spread you couldn’t control the randomness could you?

Of course you could! If you fire in a pulsatile manner, most of your bullets will stay inside your reticle. The same happens in Reach, except that your reticle is now dynamic, and you need to make reference to an “original reticle” that parallels the reticle from any other Halo game.

Turn on the Blind skull, and Reach plays just like all the other games.

> > When there was spread you couldn’t control the randomness could you?
>
> <mark>Of course you could!</mark> If you fire in a pulsatile manner, most of your bullets will stay inside your reticle. The same happens in Reach, except that your reticle is now dynamic, and you need to make reference to an “original reticle” that parallels the reticle from any other Halo game.

More easily said than done.

Go back to any other Halo and start shooting slower, and lets see if you are mora accurate than those that are shooting at the max rate of fire.

In the trilogy, there wasn’t such a thing as “spammin” or “pacing”, everyone shot at an universal rate of fire (max RoF) which had the same accuracy.

I would laugh if someone thinks in game that shooting their AR or BR slower, increases their accuracy, no It wasn’t designed that way. As a matter of fact, your H3 AR gets more accurate when you spam the trigger instead of holding it.

I don’t care of those guys that like bloom, but they still shouldn’t mistakenly think that bloom was in the other Halos.

> Turn on the Blind skull, and Reach plays just like all the other games.

You just removed the HUD icluding the reticle, but does that remove bloom?

You still beed to pace shots in order for them to be accurate. Have you played any LASO with blind on? If you have, you should know <mark>that pacing is important</mark> in order to kill grunts and jackals and to avoid wasting ammo, because if you don’t pace most of your shots will only the body of that grunt and might not hit the head.

If you would do the same thing, which is to get the blind skull in Halo 2, do you need to pace your shots there?

Aswering the thing avobe is enough.

> Actually, <mark>every fully-automatic weapon in Halo has had bloom.</mark>
>
> But other than that, yeah.
>
> And to the guy that basically said bloom and spread were the same, spread is the spreading of your shots within the stable reticle, bloom is the spread of your shots within the expanding reticle (sometimes even outside) the faster you shoot.

I don’t remember the reticles moving when shooting, or me having to shoot at burst, in lets say, the first 3 Halos.

The first auto weapons to get bloom and dynamic reticles were those in Reach, the others had uncontrollable spread and static reticles.

Do you need to pace that plasma rifle in Reach for it to be more accurate? no
Do you need to pace that plasma repeater in Reach for it to be more accurate? yes

> Go back to any other Halo and start shooting slower, and lets see if you are mora accurate than those that are shooting at the max rate of fire.

Load up one of the old Halo games, take an assault rifle (or other weapon), point it at a wall, and alternately try pulse firing it and firing it in full automatic mode. You should see a very real difference in the distribution of the bullet holes.

> I would laugh if someone thinks in game that shooting their AR or BR slower, increases their accuracy

Of course it does. It just doesn’t increase your (to borrow a dreaded MMORPG term) damage per second, or total damage output per unit of time.

> Have you played any LASO with blind on?

I don’t know what “LASO” is.

So going by your previous replies OP, you believe the only difference between bloom and spread is that with bloom you have to pace your shots, and in other Halo games you do not? And the fact it’s visualized in Reach, and not other Halos? Interesting.

LASO is Legendary, All Skulls On.

> LASO is Legendary, All Skulls On.

Thank you, snickerdoodle. (Sidenote: I hate acronyms.)

I have very deliberately never played any Halo game on Legendary with all the skulls on, because it holds absolutely no interest for me. I generally play only with those skulls that increase the difficulty in what I would call a “natural” way; that is, by increasing enemy health, upgrading enemies, etc. Taking away parts of my vision doesn’t really strike me as a worthwhile challenge.

> The only difference between “spread” and “bloom”, if that’s what they’re called, is that bloom is reflected visually, whereas spread is not.

Dear me…
Spread is a set cone of error. Let’s take Halo 3’s BR as an example, no matter how fast you fire Halo 3’s BR the first bullet in the burst has a 2-3% margin of error, the second has 19-25% and the 3rd has 36-50%. I obviously don’t know the exact figures, but you get the idea. The percentages don’t change, they’re always the same, regardless of how fast you fire. Bloom on the other hand has a dynamic %. At rest the DMR has something like a 2-3% margin of error, fire once and the percentage increase. Keep on firing or “spamming” and the percentage will continue to grow till it hits the cap. Stop for long enough and it’ll shrink back to the rest of 2-3%. Spread =/= bloom.

The competitive community hated Halo 3’s BR spread, so why Bungie thought “hey! Let’s add even bigger percentages of randomness!” is beyond me. We want zero spread again, 343.

Urgh.

You know what the real difference between “spread” and “bloom” is? The average player is most likely going to notice and give a damn about their bloom!