What's Hit-Scan?

I’ve googled it, and it’s just easier if one of you guys tells me about how this pertains to Halo 4 and the other Halos.

As soon as you pull the trigger the bullet hits them, no travel time.

It basically means “insta-hit”. If your reticule is red when you pull the trigger it hits your opponent right away. Unlike Halo 3 which had bullet travel, where it could be red but you miss because you didn’t lead your shot enough.

Which is better?

What are the pros and cons for each of them?

> Which is better?
>
> What are the pros and cons for each of them?

For online play hit scan is the fair choice and results in a far better game experience with less frustration for players, especially international players.

witch is better: hitscan

The reason is because there is no -Yoink- that goes on when it is hitscan, with hitscan you can miss shots even if you are shooting right at them.

Hit scan: If a certain criteria is met, the game does damage instantly. In Halo, if the reticule turns red, the bullets will hit instantly. There is also Infinite projectile speed, which is similar, but instead of checking to see if the reticule is red, it shoots a projectile that travels the distance of the map instantly.

The truth is that Hitscan is not actually what Halo uses. They use infinite projectile speed. It doesn’t make a huge difference gameplay wise, but it is different in how it is coded.

Pros: MUCH better for online play. It negates a lot of problems with lag. It also makes it where the average kill times are higher over range, meaning the pace of the game is faster.

Cons: Because it hits instantly, you don’t have to lead your shots. This takes some skill out of shooting. However, a lot of the time, how much you have to lead is determined by latency, so someone with a worse connection has to lead further than someone with a great connection. The result is that your connection plays a big role in how lethal you are.

> with hitscan you can miss shots even if you are shooting right at them.

What?

That makes no sense.

Anyway, Hitscan is the system of bullet detection. When you use Hitscan like Halo does, when a bullet is fired, the game instantly checks for any targets in it’s trajectory and applies damage.

The other popular method is bullet physics which have the game calculate bullet speed and other factors like drop. This method can lead to a lot of “-Yoink-” so to speak because of short falls in netcode where you can get a clear as day shot on an enemy but it won’t register because the difference in what you see as the client and what the host sees.

i thought halo 2 had quickscan not halo 3. anyways its in halo 4 and its basically red is hit white is miss

Hitscan is widely considered better for online play, but honestly, games like GoW3 and BF3 use Bullet Travel successfully because of Dedicated Servers.

Bullet Travel is the best case scenario for a skill-based game, because it forces a player to take enemy movement speed, distance, and unpredictability into account with each shot, and you must lead your shot to hit.

If 343i had dedicated servers running in Halo 4, I’d be insulted by them using Hitscan, it takes no skill, and a trained chimp could 5 shot with the DMR in Halo Reach because of it.

But since 343i is using Player to Player with host instead of servers, Hitscan is optimal for the sake of a lag-free experience.

> Hitscan is widely considered better for online play, but honestly, games like GoW3 and BF3 use Bullet Travel successfully because of Dedicated Servers.

Dedicated servers has nothing what-so-ever to do with it.

It’s purely based on netcode and as an experienced BF3 player (Colonel 40 something with well over 2.5 K/D getting 100+ kills in TDM games) I can assure you BF3s hit detection is actually quite poor.

Standing directly on top of an enemy sniper with a slug 870 shooting in the direct center of their back yet have 6+ shells not register. Not suppressed or anything. Hit scan is only effected by lag where as bullet physics are affected by lag and just general mis communication between the host and the player (FYI, dedicated servers really just mean the host isn’t a player, instead it’s a server in some random basement).