star lanes?

So I’ve started listening to Halo: Silentium (I swear I’m too dense to get this trilogy) and the librarian brings up in her testimony the presence of star lanes that I’m presuming are similar to hyperlanes in star wars but I’m confused how they work in relation to Slipstream Space (because they’re described as being far more intricate than just a row of jump beacon which also doesn’t work within the existing laws of Slipstream Space) does anyone have an idea?

If you watched the new Star Trek Discovery you will have seen the mycelial network, a galaxy or even universe spanning network of connections between places. The star roads were the same thing. They were used by the Precursors.

I can’t imagine listening to this book as it really made me stop and think at times and i often went back to refer to parts already read to understand some of the concepts. Search the forum for them to read some of the discussions about them.

Silentium is my favourite Halo book

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> If you watched the new Star Trek Discovery you will have seen the mycelial network, a galaxy or even universe spanning network of connections between places. The star roads were the same thing. They were used by the Precursors.
>
> I can’t imagine listening to this book as it really made me stop and think at times and i often went back to refer to parts already read to understand some of the concepts. Search the forum for them to read some of the discussions about them.
>
> Silentium is my favourite Halo book

That framing certainly makes more sense but still begs the question how they’re interrrelated to Slipstream Space, like is it a network artificially embedded in slipstream space to smooth out travel through slipstream (as in make it more precise etc.)?

You’re listening to these books? Geeze. I agree with FitsHisFace, I can’t imagine absorbing anything that way. I can see where the questions come from.

To help answer the question, though: the Precursors created the star roads. Worth noting: the term “star roads” is what Forerunners call them. We don’t know what the Precursors called them. If we did, we’d know that much more. What they are… is actually unclear. There were a ton of them in the Charum Hakkor system, connecting the same-named planet to its moons and to the other planets there. It’s made clear how impossible this is – they’d have to be twisting and adapting while under tremendous pressure at all times, and they do that all the time without pause or fault.
On the face of it, star roads appear to be advanced, sophisticated architecture, part machine and part structure. We don’t know what they’re made of, and only that their functionality was so high-tech that the Forerunners remained absolutely mystified by them for ten million years. When the Flood War reached fever pitch (like, after Bornstellar executed the Last Precursor), we learned that they apparently could be manipulated very, very liberally – they can move through space, and even apparently enter and come out of slipspace. It’s loosely implied (and maybe I’m just connecting dots) that there were enough of these things hidden around the galaxy that the Gravemind could outright disrupt slipspace transit by parking a bunch of them somewhere in Slipspace. Just based on the “ship” he picked up the Didact in, that wouldn’t surprise me.

So… shrug? I 'unno. They’re space magic Precursor Lego bricks. They do everything and anything. There might still be some left around, but in theory they were all destroyed when the Array fired. Actually, that would be a cool MacGuffin, at some point – if someone got a hold of star roads and a way to use them. In 2559, one person with, like, ten star roads could probably carve out a chunk of space for themselves.

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> You’re listening to these books? Geeze. I agree with FitsHisFace, I can’t imagine absorbing anything that way. I can see where the questions come from.
>
> To help answer the question, though: the Precursors created the star roads. Worth noting: the term “star roads” is what Forerunners call them. We don’t know what the Precursors called them. If we did, we’d know that much more. What they are… is actually unclear. There were a ton of them in the Charum Hakkor system, connecting the same-named planet to its moons and to the other planets there. It’s made clear how impossible this is – they’d have to be twisting and adapting while under tremendous pressure at all times, and they do that all the time without pause or fault.
> On the face of it, star roads appear to be advanced, sophisticated architecture, part machine and part structure. We don’t know what they’re made of, and only that their functionality was so high-tech that the Forerunners remained absolutely mystified by them for ten million years. When the Flood War reached fever pitch (like, after Bornstellar executed the Last Precursor), we learned that they apparently could be manipulated very, very liberally – they can move through space, and even apparently enter and come out of slipspace. It’s loosely implied (and maybe I’m just connecting dots) that there were enough of these things hidden around the galaxy that the Gravemind could outright disrupt slipspace transit by parking a bunch of them somewhere in Slipspace. Just based on the “ship” he picked up the Didact in, that wouldn’t surprise me.
>
> So… shrug? I 'unno. They’re space magic Precursor Lego bricks. They do everything and anything. There might still be some left around, but in theory they were all destroyed when the Array fired. Actually, that would be a cool MacGuffin, at some point – if someone got a hold of star roads and a way to use them. In 2559, one person with, like, ten star roads could probably carve out a chunk of space for themselves.

Eh, I mean the alternative is that I fall asleep (don’t know why but trying to read either physical books or Ebooks on iPhone cause me to nap for 30 minute intervals within 1 and a half pages) also fair enough assessment though I do feel their naming has to have something to do with their function, even a cursory function.

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Halo: Warfleet does “expand” on them a very tiny bit. Apparently the precursors used them to not only connect systems, but to literally walk on them from world to world.

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> Halo: Warfleet does “expand” on them a very tiny bit. Apparently the precursors used them to not only connect systems, but to literally walk on them from world to world.

Ah, so it does. I’m not 100% confident we can take that section as fact – while it is full of ideas we didn’t have before, it is couched in mythological overtones. Granted, unlike Mythos, Warfleet doesn’t declare an in-canon author for the text, so maybe that’s all we need to take everything it says as canon. If so, I guess they’re a book we can judge by their cover – physical roads between stars.

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> > 2533274806469514;6:
> > > 2678033349858034;4:
> > >
> >
> > Halo: Warfleet does “expand” on them a very tiny bit. Apparently the precursors used them to not only connect systems, but to literally walk on them from world to world.
>
> Ah, so it does. I’m not 100% confident we can take that section as fact – while it is full of ideas we didn’t have before, it is couched in mythological overtones. Granted, unlike Mythos, Warfleet doesn’t declare an in-canon author for the text, so maybe that’s all we need to take everything it says as canon. If so, I guess they’re a book we can judge by their cover – physical roads between stars.

Well, half and half with the physical road part. The objects that the forerunners knew were not the true star road. They were only echos, with the actual star road diving through multiple realities/dimensions. Sort of like the spartan 3 team from Ghosts of Onyx inside the slipspace pods.

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> You’re listening to these books? Geeze.

To the audiobooks’ credit, they do have the occasional moment that you only really get from having listened to them. Certain lines are given certain inflections and all that, but the coolest part was when they slowly, gradually changed the voice to Guilty Spark’s voice at the end of Primordium.

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> > 2678033349858034;4:
> > You’re listening to these books? Geeze.
>
> To the audiobooks’ credit, they do have the occasional moment that you only really get from having listened to them. Certain lines are given certain inflections and all that, but the coolest part was when they slowly, gradually changed the voice to Guilty Spark’s voice at the end of Primordium.

I was thinking about that when I reread the Forerunner Saga couple months back. There’s a section where the Lord of Admirals usurps control of the story – is there a different actor for that?

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> > 2533274813912897;9:
> > > 2678033349858034;4:
> > > You’re listening to these books? Geeze.
> >
> > To the audiobooks’ credit, they do have the occasional moment that you only really get from having listened to them. Certain lines are given certain inflections and all that, but the coolest part was when they slowly, gradually changed the voice to Guilty Spark’s voice at the end of Primordium.
>
> I was thinking about that when I reread the Forerunner Saga couple months back. There’s a section where the Lord of Admirals usurps control of the story – is there a different actor for that?

No Timothy Dadabo did the entire audiobook