someone explain to me how lag "works" please?

So when the game lags for me, it keeps setting me back in the same spot I started when the lag happens, so when I move, it feels like it resets my position.
This is frustrating in multiplayer because it seems like it only affects me, and not the opposing player. Does this mean I’m lagging and my opponent is fine? Because they seem to be able to have no issue. XD

https://youtu.be/-RJP-YgCFvI?t=25s
(and no, this is NOT me playing)

And what causes the lag?
I have verizon fios and have pretty dependable internet upload/download speed, so what gives? Why does it seem like playing against players outside of the United States makes me lag, but not them?

Lag explained

> 2533274880633045;2:
> Lag explained

can you sum the video up in 3-5 sentences? i’m about to play Halo.

Basically lag is that the input is not spot on so you react late. The game gets confused where you are so they put you in a spot that you passed now it realizes that you are actually on the roof so it puts you there then there’s a bunch of the game finding out where are you exactly, so it puts you back and forth until you get ticked and leave the game

> 2535454723805219;4:
> Basically lag is that the input is not spot on so you react late. The game gets confused where you are so they put you in a spot that you passed now it realizes that you are actually on the roof so it puts you there then there’s a bunch of the game finding out where are you exactly, so it puts you back and forth until you get ticked and leave the game

and it doesn’t affect the other players??

  • Ok so imagine you’re standing at point A, and the server is working fine, it knows you’re at A. Everything is in sync. - Now as you move to point B, the server has an interrupt with your Xbox, it may be your network, their server, or a blip on the lines that are constantly under load all over the world. - As this interrupt happens, your last known position to the server was point A, but you are now at B on your local Xbox. This is important, locally you see yourself at point B, but the server thinks you are still at A. Now your Xbox does not dictate to the master server, the server dictates to your Xbox. - When the reconnect happens, usually after a second or so as you perceive it, the server looks at both sets of data, decides that you’re not where you’re supposed to be, and in order to resolve this, move you back to where it thinks you should be. - This means that you are moved back to point A as your Xbox is subordinate to the server. So you see what we call lag, and it usually repeats itself a few times until the server/network stabilizes. - Other people may or may not be affected by this, it depends on what they are sending/receiving at the same time as you, and remember that its way more complicated than sending electricity through a line.

> 2533274884387290;6:
> - Ok so imagine you’re standing at point A, and the server is working fine, it knows you’re at A. Everything is in sync.
> - Now as you move to point B, the server has an interrupt with your Xbox, it may be your network, their server, or a blip on the lines that are constantly under load all over the world.
> - As this interrupt happens, your last known position to the server was point A, but you are now at B on your local Xbox. This is important, locally you see yourself at point B, but the server thinks you are still at A. Now your Xbox does not dictate to the master server, the server dictates to your Xbox.
> - When the reconnect happens, usually after a second or so as you perceive it, the server looks at both sets of data, decides that you’re not where you’re supposed to be, and in order to resolve this, move you back to where it thinks you should be.
> - This means that you are moved back to point A as your Xbox is subordinate to the server. So you see what we call lag, and it usually repeats itself a few times until the server/network stabilizes.
> - Other people may or may not be affected by this, it depends on what they are sending/receiving at the same time as you, and remember that its way more complicated than sending electricity through a line.

In layman’s terms, this is called Rubber-banding.

> 2533274826920712;7:
> > 2533274884387290;6:
> > - Ok so imagine you’re standing at point A, and the server is working fine, it knows you’re at A. Everything is in sync.
> > - Now as you move to point B, the server has an interrupt with your Xbox, it may be your network, their server, or a blip on the lines that are constantly under load all over the world.
> > - As this interrupt happens, your last known position to the server was point A, but you are now at B on your local Xbox. This is important, locally you see yourself at point B, but the server thinks you are still at A. Now your Xbox does not dictate to the master server, the server dictates to your Xbox.
> > - When the reconnect happens, usually after a second or so as you perceive it, the server looks at both sets of data, decides that you’re not where you’re supposed to be, and in order to resolve this, move you back to where it thinks you should be.
> > - This means that you are moved back to point A as your Xbox is subordinate to the server. So you see what we call lag, and it usually repeats itself a few times until the server/network stabilizes.
> > - Other people may or may not be affected by this, it depends on what they are sending/receiving at the same time as you, and remember that its way more complicated than sending electricity through a line.
>
>
> In layman’s terms, this is called Rubber-banding.

Doesn’t particularly matter, the average guy doesn’t really care, I explained it in the way most people think of when they see lag.

The actual lag, what is technically called latency is simply the natural restriction on transmission of data through the network.