Slip Space Engine in Infinite - Expectations

With the new game engine coming out for Halo Infinite, as well as the Xbox Series X seeming to be a hunk of a game system, what are your expectations for game play possibilities? This could include anything from graphics, to sound design, to physics, forge, vehicles, weapons, armor, and anything in between. Be descriptive and creative.

The new engine will have been designed with forge in mind… as opposed to being tacked on to what sounded like a very difficult and cumbersome engine.

I expect Forge maps to be virtually indistinguishable from developer maps (apart from the obvious difference of being able to add new assets).

Can’t wait to see what the (very talented) Forge community can create!

Obvious stuff like better graphics, performance, AI, but what I’m really interested in is what forge is going to be like. H5’s forge was one of the things great about the game and I can’t wait to see what it’ll be like assuming that they’re designing the engine with it in mind. I’m hoping for forge maps that don’t look like they were made for the original xbox for starters.

I’d like to see more dynamic vehicle damage and physics based nonsense. One of my favorite things about the Halo 2/3/reach campaigns is the unpredictability that physics added to the engagements. Grunts would fly around if you ruptured their methane tanks, jet pack brutes would do the same if you damaged their jet pack, and hunters would smack random objects out of the way or towards the player. Vehicles were much more fun in the Bungie games. They exploded into many more pieces, ghosts would crumble and had an unpredictable secondary explosion, warthogs could be launched in much more fun and interesting ways, phantoms would actually explode into a bunch of bits that littered the battlefield and not just disappear into a puff of purple smoke. Most of these elements were way toned down or non existent in Halo 4/5. For me this is where a lot of the replayability, fun, and the laughs came from in game. I don’t know why these changes were made, but I hope the new engine allows all the things that made halo fun to return and be expanded upon while maintaining the graphical fidelity we expect.

I expect competency of enemy AI to be very dynamic, with high ranking enemies having a very clear self preservation strategy about them. And enemies working as a unit to draw us out of cover, out flank, push us when our shields are down etc…

I want the number of AI units operating at once to be higher, so we can have large scale battles, in addition to feel like we’re part of an eco system on the Halo ring (reach attempted this).

I expect Forge to be a step up with regards to lighting and being distinguishable from 343 maps.

I expect vast and detailed vistas, with draw distances to accommodate the artistic vision.

On series X, I expect solid frame rate on split screen.

This is more of a creative decision, than a software limitation… But my God I want to see dynamic AI scarab battles re: Halo 3 return!!! Or something similar.

> 2557401216976241;4:
> I’d like to see more dynamic vehicle damage and physics based nonsense. One of my favorite things about the Halo 2/3/reach campaigns is the unpredictability that physics added to the engagements. Grunts would fly around if you ruptured their methane tanks, jet pack brutes would do the same if you damaged their jet pack, and hunters would smack random objects out of the way or towards the player. Vehicles were much more fun in the Bungie games. They exploded into many more pieces, ghosts would crumble and had an unpredictable secondary explosion, warthogs could be launched in much more fun and interesting ways, phantoms would actually explode into a bunch of bits that littered the battlefield and not just disappear into a puff of purple smoke. Most of these elements were way toned down or non existent in Halo 4/5. For me this is where a lot of the replayability, fun, and the laughs came from in game. I don’t know why these changes were made, but I hope the new engine allows all the things that made halo fun to return and be expanded upon while maintaining the graphical fidelity we expect.

I agree whole heartedly with the statement you make about vehicles. A great example is of when you destroy the scarab in Halo 3; it makes you feel like you actually destroyed the scarab as it ruptures into a thousand pieces with a giant blue ball of flame. The vehicle explosions do feel a little lack luster in Halo 4-5, probably because they didn’t fully understand the engine, but come Halo Infinite I hope that all changes.

> 2533274801176657;5:
> I expect competency of enemy AI to be very dynamic, with high ranking enemies having a very clear self preservation strategy about them. And enemies working as a unit to draw us out of cover, out flank, push us when our shields are down etc…
>
> I want the number of AI units operating at once to be higher, so we can have large scale battles, in addition to feel like we’re part of an eco system on the Halo ring (reach attempted this).
>
> I expect Forge to be a step up with regards to lighting and being distinguishable from 343 maps.
>
> I expect vast and detailed vistas, with draw distances to accommodate the artistic vision.
>
> On series X, I expect solid frame rate on split screen.
>
> This is more of a creative decision, than a software limitation… But my God I want to see dynamic AI scarab battles re: Halo 3 return!!! Or something similar.

I’ve always loved creating cool little forge maps, as well as playing others’ on custom games. I hope that the forge maps are dynamic, and creative forgers are able to script things that are interactive to the player, even something as simple as opening doors, either manually or by proximity. Forge has come a long way, and there have been huge jumps in each forge from one game to the next, so let’s hope that Halo Infinite and future games’ forges blow our socks off.

The whole AI thing as well, you make a good point. I remember Halo 5’s being pretty lack luster, where they weren’t very interactive. Along with that, it would be cool to have that same kind of vision with AI in campaign to be utilized in forge as well, where we can create AI of all different types and sizes, and maybe apply certain AI behaviors to different characters.

> 2533275031939856;3:
> Obvious stuff like better graphics, performance, AI, but what I’m really interested in is what forge is going to be like. H5’s forge was one of the things great about the game and I can’t wait to see what it’ll be like assuming that they’re designing the engine with it in mind. I’m hoping for forge maps that don’t look like they were made for the original xbox for starters.

I think Halo 5 stepped into the uncanny valley when it comes to map making, because they had developed forge to be much better than all the other games, but it wasn’t quite good enough to convince you that it was an actual map. Hopefully Halo Infinite kind of steps out of this.

This may seem minor but I hope we can have emblems on our Spartans again. I was a little sad they didn’t have it in Halo 5. Or maybe if they continue the Spartan Company mechanic, we could have the option between that emblem or our own personal ones.

I just hope it’s open to the public, like the Unreal Engine 4, Unity and so forth.

I doubt it’ll be public. Maybe it’s a possibility with the while open-source Microsoft movement but I doubt wel see anything more than a moddable PC version of the game akin to what MCC PC has.

> 2533274870308953;9:
> This may seem minor but I hope we can have emblems on our Spartans again. I was a little sad they didn’t have it in Halo 5. Or maybe if they continue the Spartan Company mechanic, we could have the option between that emblem or our own personal ones.

Yeah I noticed that too. I never looked at the in game player models in Reach MCC, but on the one in the character edit, I don’t see an emblem on the player model. I thought it was a neat addition to Halo, especially when it was on your shoulder like in Halo three, because it was a lot easier to see, and a lot more noticeable.

> 2557401216976241;4:
> I’d like to see more dynamic vehicle damage and physics based nonsense. One of my favorite things about the Halo 2/3/reach campaigns is the unpredictability that physics added to the engagements. Grunts would fly around if you ruptured their methane tanks, jet pack brutes would do the same if you damaged their jet pack, and hunters would smack random objects out of the way or towards the player. Vehicles were much more fun in the Bungie games. They exploded into many more pieces, ghosts would crumble and had an unpredictable secondary explosion, warthogs could be launched in much more fun and interesting ways, phantoms would actually explode into a bunch of bits that littered the battlefield and not just disappear into a puff of purple smoke. Most of these elements were way toned down or non existent in Halo 4/5. For me this is where a lot of the replayability, fun, and the laughs came from in game. I don’t know why these changes were made, but I hope the new engine allows all the things that made halo fun to return and be expanded upon while maintaining the graphical fidelity we expect.

Remember back in CE, when the vehicles were invincible and the grenades and pistol were absolutely crazy​:joy::joy::joy:

> 2533274795123910;10:
> I just hope it’s open to the public, like the Unreal Engine 4, Unity and so forth.

Unless Microsoft is interested in licensing the engine out to 3rd party developers, I don’t see why it would make the new, -Yoink!- engine public.

As for my personal expectations of the engine, I’m simply expecting a grander and more robust game.

All of the marketing for the Slipspace Engine has focused on its ability to create games on a large scale with a quicker iteration timeline because it’s a much simpler engine to use for non technical employees. I’m expecting this will increase artist/designer productivity as they spend less time fiddling with the engine, and more time actually creating new game assets/encounters.

> 2533274935834633;14:
> > 2533274795123910;10:
> > I just hope it’s open to the public, like the Unreal Engine 4, Unity and so forth.
>
> Unless Microsoft is interested in licensing the engine out to 3rd party developers, I don’t see why it would make the new, -Yoink!- engine public.

Considering Microsoft’s team work with smaller studios with smaller games, Microsoft could benefit from having the engine open to public, if smaller studios are interested in starting to use said engine. That is, outside of licensing income.

Gears of War use the Unreal Engine, but I suspect Microsoft want to have their Xbox games use the Slip Space Engine, like, an in-house engine. Like the FrostBite is used by EA, and so forth.
Thus, having the Slip Space engine open, they’ll most likely get a far better look at what kind of people are using the engine, thus it becomes easier for them to search for interesting projects. Also, as they may find an interesting project, it’s already on their own engine, and the developer(s) are already somewhat accustomed to the engine as they’ve started the project with the Slip Space engine.

It’s not just the Licensing money there for Microsoft, given their previous track record with smaller developers.

> 2533274935834633;14:
> All of the marketing for the Slipspace Engine has focused on its ability to create games on a large scale with a quicker iteration timeline because it’s a much simpler engine to use for non technical employees. I’m expecting this will increase artist/designer productivity as they spend less time fiddling with the engine, and more time actually creating new game assets/encounters.

See, if this is what’s offered with the Engine, it’s a plus for developers outside of Microsoft’s emplyoment.
Then with what I said earlier, it’ll be positive for Microsoft.

Sure, they may not make it public, but I think that’d be a mistake.

> 2533274795123910;15:
> > 2533274935834633;14:
> > > 2533274795123910;10:
> > > I just hope it’s open to the public, like the Unreal Engine 4, Unity and so forth.
> >
> > Unless Microsoft is interested in licensing the engine out to 3rd party developers, I don’t see why it would make the new, -Yoink!- engine public.
>
> Considering Microsoft’s team work with smaller studios with smaller games, Microsoft could benefit from having the engine open to public, if smaller studios are interested in starting to use said engine. That is, outside of licensing income.
>
> Gears of War use the Unreal Engine, but I suspect Microsoft want to have their Xbox games use the Slip Space Engine, like, an in-house engine. Like the FrostBite is used by EA, and so forth.
> Thus, having the Slip Space engine open, they’ll most likely get a far better look at what kind of people are using the engine, thus it becomes easier for them to search for interesting projects. Also, as they may find an interesting project, it’s already on their own engine, and the developer(s) are already somewhat accustomed to the engine as they’ve started the project with the Slip Space engine.
>
> It’s not just the Licensing money there for Microsoft, given their previous track record with smaller developers.
>
>
>
>
> > 2533274935834633;14:
> > All of the marketing for the Slipspace Engine has focused on its ability to create games on a large scale with a quicker iteration timeline because it’s a much simpler engine to use for non technical employees. I’m expecting this will increase artist/designer productivity as they spend less time fiddling with the engine, and more time actually creating new game assets/encounters.
>
> See, if this is what’s offered with the Engine, it’s a plus for developers outside of Microsoft’s emplyoment.
> Then with what I said earlier, it’ll be positive for Microsoft.
>
> Sure, they may not make it public, but I think that’d be a mistake.

I could also see it being used for third party developers making Halo spin-offs that we’ve wanted for a while, like a Flood horror game. There are a lot of possibilities that could come out of licensing it to different developers outside of 343 for the use of Halo games. Also it being used as a in house engine like Frostbite for EA, I’m sure Microsoft could pull some tricks with new Xbox exclusive games that come out with the Series X that would make groundbreaking release sales from a company standpoint.

I never even thought about Microsoft letting other first party devs use the slipspace engine. As precious posts have stated that possibility. I think it would be neat and give developers a new, and modern engine to work with strictly for Xbox. Could be an incentive for developers to work contractually with Microsoft and have some of the best tools supplied to them. And the possibility of making halo games is wide open with this engine. Especially if it’s easy to work with we might be getting games in a faster time frame than what we’ve ever seen.

> 2533274842758217;1:
> With the new game engine coming out for Halo Infinite, as well as the Xbox Series X seeming to be a hunk of a game system, what are your expectations for game play possibilities? This could include anything from graphics, to sound design, to physics, forge, vehicles, weapons, armor, and anything in between. Be descriptive and creative.

My expectations are firmly in check at this time. Halo Infinite will be a cross gen release. It will release for day one Xbox One, S, X, Series X, PC and possibly Lockhart if it’s still a thing, and I think it will be, Series X seems to be Anaconda and I think it will be a premium item with a premium price tag, Microsoft will need a console priced competitively with PS5. I have no idea what the Slipspace engine can do. However, I doubt what we saw at E3 was running on a day one Xbox One, and that’s why my expectations are in check. How will that console or even S restrict Halo Infinite ? If at all.