Sentinel Question

Sentinels are supposed to be humanity’s allies as humans are reclaimers.

So besides the handful of in-game instances of Sentinels attacking humans, in what other instances would a Sentinel have to attack a Human?

When a human poses a great risk to a Forerunner structure or installation I guess

Sentinels are hardwired to defend against any threat to their charge(s). It doesn’t matter if that threat is a Reclaimer or (as seen in Cryptum) even a Forerunner. The Sentinels assigned to the original Halos attacked the Forerunner fleet when their installations came under fire during the Battle of the Capital.

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> Sentinels are hardwired to defend against any threat to their charge(s). It doesn’t matter if that threat is a Reclaimer or (as seen in Cryptum) even a Forerunner. The Sentinels assigned to the original Halos attacked the Forerunner fleet when their installations came under fire during the Battle of the Capital.

Beat me to it :stuck_out_tongue:

Didn’t know that about Cryptum.

I sort of always knew this stuff, but never made sense to me. So the Sentinels and Monitors expect Reclaimers–those allegedly assigned the Mantle–to actually want to activate Halos and kill themselves? Spark is always saying “Splendid!” Shouldn’t Spark and the Sentinels want to protect the Reclaimers? Or do they only protect them up until the point they have to activate a ring or something?

In the games, once Spark learns that both Chief wants to stop Alpha Halo from firing in CE, and learns that Johnson wants to prematurely activate its replacement in H3, he turns against them. My next question is, what else would constitute such a threat?

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> I sort of always knew this stuff, but never made sense to me. So the Sentinels and Monitors expect Reclaimers–those allegedly assigned the Mantle–to actually want to activate Halos and kill themselves? Spark is always saying “Splendid!” Shouldn’t Spark and the Sentinels want to protect the Reclaimers? Or do they only protect them up until the point they have to activate a ring or something?
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> In the games, once Spark learns that both Chief wants to stop Alpha Halo from firing in CE, and learns that Johnson wants to prematurely activate its replacement in H3, he turns against them. My next question is, what else would constitute such a threat?

To address your first point: Primordium reveals that the humans on Installation 07 (one of the original twelve rings, later added to the second Array) were unharmed by the Halo’s test firing. EDIT: This is because the Halos can lock envelop themselves within slipspace, much like Trevelyan.

For the other: If it’s likely to cause harm to the installation, it dies. Granted, Spark was in the throes of rampancy when he snapped.

they just attack whatever is a threat xD

Think of it this way, you guard and maintain something for 100,000 years (Which feels even longer due to how AI’s perceive things), and suddenly someone shows up who can actually use it. Would you not be excited to finally have all your hard work pay off?

Spark is also completely oblivious to the Librarian’s plans due to compartmentalization. He only knows the basic concepts like Geas and Reclaimer.

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> > 2533274811804036;5:
> > I sort of always knew this stuff, but never made sense to me. So the Sentinels and Monitors expect Reclaimers–those allegedly assigned the Mantle–to actually want to activate Halos and kill themselves? Spark is always saying “Splendid!” Shouldn’t Spark and the Sentinels want to protect the Reclaimers? Or do they only protect them up until the point they have to activate a ring or something?
> >
> > In the games, once Spark learns that both Chief wants to stop Alpha Halo from firing in CE, and learns that Johnson wants to prematurely activate its replacement in H3, he turns against them. My next question is, what else would constitute such a threat?
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> To address your first point: Primordium reveals that the humans on Installation 07 (one of the original twelve rings, later added to the second Array) were unharmed by the Halo’s test firing. This is probably because the old Halos fired directed pulses. The six new models fire omnidirectional bursts; chances are any life on the ring would die.

Actually, it’s revealed in Primordium that the surface of the ring can timelock itself, thus preventing the pulse from affecting it’s inhabitants.

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> > 2533274900126904;6:
> > To address your first point: Primordium reveals that the humans on Installation 07 (one of the original twelve rings, later added to the second Array) were unharmed by the Halo’s test firing. This is probably because the old Halos fired directed pulses. The six new models fire omnidirectional bursts; chances are any life on the ring would die.
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>
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> Actually, it’s revealed in Primordium that the surface of the ring can timelock itself, thus preventing the pulse from affecting it’s inhabitants.

I actually wrote about the timelocking in my first draft of that post. I’m not sure why I changed tact, to be honest. I’ve adjusted the post to follow my original train of thought.

Another instance is if the person does not follow protocol and unleashes the flood upon the Forerunner installation\artifact