Reasons why ODST's campaign is the best so far

ODST is my favorite campaign for quite a lot of reasons, actually:

  1. You’re not playing an augmented super soldier that “has become ridiculously powerful” (quote from Joseph Staten in an ODST vidoc) but basically a normal human being.

  2. No Flood. The Flood are essential to the (first) trilogy, and I really think they are a far more interesting and fascinating enemy than the Covenant. But it became rather boring having to fight them after you did so already in three games.

  3. ODST finally succeeds at capturing the mood all Halo games ought to have. It’s depressing, scary, dark and gloomy, and threatening. That’s exactly the mood a game ought to have in which you’re fighting a losing war against a technologically superior alliance of aliens hell-bent on wiping out mankind.

  4. On the same note, at least the looks of New Mombasa also captured that mood perfectly. You’re running (or sneaking) through a dark, abandoned city occupied by Covenant forces where you can and have to pick your fights, and not waltzing through bright and colorful environments, killing Covies left and right like you did for the most part in H:CE, H2, and H3.

  5. The transitions from playing the Rookie to another squad member and back again are done quite smoothly. Far more smoothly than the transitions from Master Chief to the Arbiter and back again in H2. Playing as multiple characters also added a lot to the fun of ODST.

  6. You can finally do some exploring (even though only in New Mombasa) and actually get something that’s worthwhile. Not only do you get to experience another person’s fate that has nothing to do with the UNSC, i.e. Sadie’s, but you also unlock weapon/supply caches that way.

  7. ODST manages to provide more character development - and for multiple characters, no less - than the whole trilogy provided for Master Chief.

  8. Unlike in Reach, your NPC allies actually are useful. For example, give Mickey a rocket launcher when playing through the ONI level and he’ll single-handedly kill more Covies during that one level than Carter, Kat, Emile, Jun, and Jorge combined during the whole Reach campaign.

  9. The final stand-off in ODST at the end of the highway felt more epic than the battle at the landing pads in Reach, even though you it was easier and you had to fight far less enemies.

It’s really not hard to see why I think that ODST’s campaign truly is the best of the whole Halo series so far. What are your reasons?

> ODST is my favorite campaign for quite a lot of reasons, actually:
>
> 1. You’re not playing an augmented super soldier that “has become ridiculously powerful” (quote from Joseph Staten in an ODST vidoc) but basically a normal human being.
>
> 2. No Flood. The Flood are essential to the (first) trilogy, and I really think they are a far more interesting and fascinating enemy than the Covenant. But it became rather boring having to fight them after you did so already in three games.
>
> 3. ODST finally succeeds at capturing the mood all Halo games ought to have. It’s depressing, scary, dark and gloomy, and threatening. That’s exactly the mood a game ought to have in which you’re fighting a losing war against a technologically superior alliance of aliens hell-bent on wiping out mankind.
>
> 4. On the same note, at least the looks of New Mombasa also captured that mood perfectly. You’re running (or sneaking) through a dark, abandoned city occupied by Covenant forces where you can and have to pick your fights, and not waltzing through bright and colorful environments, killing Covies left and right like you did for the most part in H:CE, H2, and H3.
>
> 5. The transitions from playing the Rookie to another squad member and back again are done quite smoothly. Far more smoothly than the transitions from Master Chief to the Arbiter and back again in H2. Playing as multiple characters also added a lot to the fun of ODST.
>
> 6. You can finally do some exploring (even though only in New Mombasa) and actually get something that’s worthwhile. Not only do you get to experience another person’s fate that has nothing to do with the UNSC, i.e. Sadie’s, but you also unlock weapon/supply caches that way.
>
> 7. ODST manages to provide more character development - and for multiple characters, no less - than the whole trilogy provided for Master Chief.
>
> 8. Unlike in Reach, your NPC allies actually are useful. For example, give Mickey a rocket launcher when playing through the ONI level and he’ll single-handedly kill more Covies during that one level than Carter, Kat, Emile, Jun, and Jorge combined during the whole Reach campaign.
>
> 9. The final stand-off in ODST at the end of the highway felt more epic than the battle at the landing pads in Reach, even though you it was easier and you had to fight far less enemies.
>
> It’s really not hard to see why I think that ODST’s campaign truly is the best of the whole Halo series so far. What are your reasons?

While I’m not sure if ODST was my favorite, I definitely loved it’s campaign. It’s probably in the top 3. Plus, it had the best firefight.

ODST is good, but I still prefer H2 as the best halo campaign yet. The story telling is just top notch in H2. However, it’s a shame how we can’t get to know the rookie in depth

One of my favorite campaigns of any game.
While I don’t 100% agree with some of your points, I agreed with most of them.
The only downside is the length.

Agreed. ODST is my favorite Halo game, and my favorite video game in general. You forgot to mention the best music in the series, too.

ODST wasn’t the best in terms of realism, though. No human could kill that many Brutes, when Spartans tend to struggle with just one. Sure, gameplay would be bland otherwise, but still. Canonically I don’t think the ODSTs killed THAT many enemies. I think they rather survived by chance.

But I have a feeling we will see our ODST squad again. They are like the A-Team of Halo now. They will go in together, and get out together.

H2 campaign was my favorite, the whole mysterious religion things it was just so dang interesting to me. However Halo 3 ODST has an awsome campaign! Your right its dark its sad its gloomy it definately feels like mankind is fighting for survival. I truly believe if Halo 4 goes in an ODST direction it will be amazing.

<4 <343

> ODST wasn’t the best in terms of realism, though. No human could kill that many Brutes, when Spartans tend to struggle with just one. Sure, gameplay would be bland otherwise, but still. Canonically I don’t think the ODSTs killed THAT many enemies. I think they rather survived by chance.

Yep, that was primarially for gameplay issues. For example, in the cutsecne, it took almost the whole squad to take down the Chieftain.

I don’t know if I’d go so far as to say it is the best campaign, but I will say that ODST had the hands down best/most balanced weapon sandbox of any Halo game. The game mechanics and ideas were also rock solid: Predictable recoil>>>Bloom, weaker melee, vehicles work perfectly.

It honestly dissapointed me that it was the only original Halo game not to include multiplayer because of these^ solid mechanics.

It also gave us something the Halo series has been needing for a long time: A true long range non-power weapon to bridge the gap between Versatile headshot weapons(BR/Carbine) and the Snipers. It also added a casual versatile starting weapon for people who do not always want a hyper competitive experience(M7S).

The similar close range weapons were given unique roles as the AR did low shield damage but had high rof, range, health damage. The Spiker also did low shield damage but it had even higher health damage and a very healpful melee bonus. The PR had larger shield and overall damage and accuracy but low ROF and health DPS. Even the “redundant” CQC weapons had a purpose.

The M6S was far superior to the Carbine at range but it was not helpless at close range because of its RoF, which was in turn kept in check by its recoil. This nearly perfected the weapon sandbox. ODST set the foundation for a perfect weapon sandbox needing only a few improvements
Starting from close range to long range

Hammer<Sword<Mauler<Shotgun<Spiker<AR/SMG<PP<PR<Needler<M7S/BR/Carbine<M6S<Beam/Sniper
Explosives
GL ,Brute shot(H2), Concussion, Fuel Rod(2/3/Reach), Rocket(Reach), Plasma Launcher, Laser(Reach)

> You forgot to mention the best music in the series, too.

That I did. I wanted to edit my post to include the music but then got distracted and forgot. ^^

That the campaign is rather short is probably its biggest downside, and I would have very much loved it if it was twice as long - or even longer, for that matter.

As for H2, it’s my least favorite campaign of all Halo games. It’s still great fun, but over long stretches it feels like you’re playing H:CE’s campaign all over again. If you took out the parts where you play as the Arbiter, you might think it’s basically H:CE with just a few differences. Let me explain:

In both H:CE and H2 you start out in a human installation or environment; the Pillar of Autumn in H:CE and Cairo station along with Mombasa in H2, and in both you’re fighting against boarding/invading Covenant forces. Next you’re taken to a Halo ring, and on both rings you first have to combat Covenant only before at some point the Flood turn up. Finally you’re not fighting on Halo directly anymore but either in the remains of the PoA, or High Charity.

Of course there are differences in gameplay and storytelling, but overall H2 really feels like you’re playing H:CE again instead of something fresh and new. What also might play a role is that the game is practically cheating, at least on legendary. :wink:

Man odst was awesome! I love this firefight than that “Other game’s” I really did feel like that was the last game they made specificly for the fans.

> ODST wasn’t the best in terms of realism, though. No human could kill that many Brutes, when Spartans tend to struggle with just one. Sure, gameplay would be bland otherwise, but still. Canonically I don’t think the ODSTs killed THAT many enemies. I think they rather survived by chance.
>
> But I have a feeling we will see our ODST squad again. They are like the A-Team of Halo now. They will go in together, and get out together.

in halo 3, i killed brutes in less than 5 seconds, how is that struggling?

As far as fan reception is concerned, ODST is under rated. A lot of people think the campaign was weak and the worst in the series. The only reason people hate it is because it was 60 buck. If it was a $40 game, people would have loved it. I agree with most of what you said about it’s qualities. ODST is probably the most unique out of all the Halo titles, given all the elements it combines successfully.

While ODST was enjoyable, the story is quite confusing. I know that the ODST troopers are assigned to drop onto a Covenant ship that escapes, but after that, I’m lost. Supposedly, you’re this rookie that is looking for clues of your comrades’ whereabouts. Times where you have to search for an object to trigger a cutscene, however, were as fun as sitting on a stool and staring at a blank wall. No question that the action was intense, but playing as the rookie was more of an errand than a pleasure. I don’t know, maybe it’s just that I’m new, but in the story category, ODST was lacking. But hey, that’s just me. Of ODST and Reach, in my opinion, the latter is the better.

> As far as fan reception is concerned, ODST is under rated. A lot of people think the campaign was weak and the worst in the series. The only reason people hate it is because it was 60 buck. If it was a $40 game, people would have loved it. I agree with most of what you said about it’s qualities. ODST is probably the most unique out of all the Halo titles, given all the elements it combines successfully.

I agree that it is under rated. I am playing it for the first time since my first play through when the game came out. The audio logs add a lot to the atmoshphere as well. You get the sense that you are losing a fights. When playing as Rookie I feel like I’m all alone after the apocalypse or something. While it may be low on action the story is the darkest of the Halos.

Yeah! Halo 4:ODST, I can see it now.

> ODST wasn’t the best in terms of realism, though. No human could kill that many Brutes, when Spartans tend to struggle with just one. Sure, gameplay would be bland otherwise, but still. Canonically I don’t think the ODSTs killed THAT many enemies. I think they rather survived by chance.
>
> But I have a feeling we will see our ODST squad again. They are like the A-Team of Halo now. They will go in together, and get out together.

> 1. You’re not playing an augmented super soldier that “has become ridiculously powerful” (quote from Joseph Staten in an ODST vidoc) but basically a normal human being.

Where you feel like a spartan junior. Seriously, the playstyle was the same.

> 2. No Flood. The Flood are essential to the (first) trilogy, and I really think they are a far more interesting and fascinating enemy than the Covenant. But it became rather boring having to fight them after you did so already in three games.

How is that an advantage over Halo CE? I can understand not wanting to see them again, but they were fresh in the first game. It BECAME boring, but it wasn’t back in the day.

> 3. ODST finally succeeds at capturing the mood all Halo games ought to have. It’s depressing, scary, dark and gloomy, and threatening. That’s exactly the mood a game ought to have in which you’re fighting a losing war against a technologically superior alliance of aliens hell-bent on wiping out mankind.

It’s the mood Halo 3 and the beginning of Halo 2 should have. But for Halo CE, it’s something that’s hard to feel the need since you’re so far from the actual war. The feel of mystery, unknown and adventure is far more fitting for the original. The dark and gloom fits ODST, but as the mystery and adventure fits Halo CE. Also, how can you feel that mood of depression and all when you’re playing as a super-soldier fighting alone on alien worlds? To feel that atmosphere, you need to see the destruction and allies, people suffering.

> 4. On the same note, at least the looks of New Mombasa also captured that mood perfectly. You’re running (or sneaking) through a dark, abandoned city occupied by Covenant forces where you can and have to pick your fights, and not waltzing through bright and colorful environments, killing Covies left and right like you did for the most part in H:CE, H2, and H3.

How is that an advantage over past Halo games? That’s preferences here. In past Halo games, you were a super-soldier fighting through alien worlds.

> 5. The transitions from playing the Rookie to another squad member and back again are done quite smoothly. Far more smoothly than the transitions from Master Chief to the Arbiter and back again in H2. Playing as multiple characters also added a lot to the fun of ODST.

I don’t see how the transitions were far smoothier. Smoothier yes, but not by that much. Anyway, playing between the Chief and Arbiter felt much more different than playing between any of these interchangeable ODST. The Arbiter played the same, but you played among the Covenant doing Covenant objectives, the feel was much more different, and I fail to see how the Arbiter bit of Halo 2 has to be jealous over any Halo game. I prefer the Halo CE mood, but it’s as strong there. Anyway, other Halo games don’t have transitions problems, it’s always going to be smoother when there are none, so it’s not exactly a strong advantage for ODST here.

> 6. You can finally do some exploring (even though only in New Mombasa) and actually get something that’s worthwhile. Not only do you get to experience another person’s fate that has nothing to do with the UNSC, i.e. Sadie’s, but you also unlock weapon/supply caches that way.

And there isn’t much more to do than fight enemies or ignore them. But that’s a step in the right direction. Sure the additional story was interesting (although I think it’s overrated, wasn’t that great), but those broke the pace of the campaign. It’s more things to go back and explore New Mombasa (which you need to do through and through to get the whole story) than an integral part of the campaign. At least that’s how I see it considering it’s harmful to the campaign experience.

> 7. ODST manages to provide more character development - and for multiple characters, no less - than the whole trilogy provided for Master Chief.

Well, I think the Halo trilogy storyline goes beyond the Chief’s character. It’s not like he’s the last hope and needs to save the galaxy. I mean, I don’t think you should expect much character development from a man who was bred as a killing machine who’s constantly all over the place to save the day. The ODSTs are more human and act on a much smaller scale, so it’s much more normal. And frankly, how can anyone say they were good characters? They were archetypes of Hollywood war movies, it’s like I saw each of them countless of times in more interesting fashions. They were boring and… well, I don’t see how you can point out character development considering how limited it was. Do you count dialogues as character development? Except maybe for Dare and the dude, the squad wasn’t much better than the Chief. Hell, the Arbiter is the character who got the most character development of the whole franchise.

> 8. Unlike in Reach, your NPC allies actually are useful. For example, give Mickey a rocket launcher when playing through the ONI level and he’ll single-handedly kill more Covies during that one level than Carter, Kat, Emile, Jun, and Jorge combined during the whole Reach campaign.

Reach isn’t exactly the best example, EVERY other Halo game has much better ally AI…

> 9. The final stand-off in ODST at the end of the highway felt more epic than the battle at the landing pads in Reach, even though you it was easier and you had to fight far less enemies.

And every major fight in Halo CE was more epic. And let’s not even talk of the scarab fights of Halo 3.

I think Halo CE and 2 are better campaigns for sure. You can’t beat the feel of the first game, of trying to escape from the Covenant, only to be boarded and crash on a mysterious alien world, then trying to gather forces and understand what this ring is and what the Covenant want. You go through an interesting variety of environments, the missions are long and help convey a sense of progression, adventure and scale. The campaign throws at you twists and turns, changing things up a bit half-way through; fights with solely the Covenant, solely the flood, both, 3-way with sentinels, etc. Halo CE offered a wide variety of encounters, big and small scale with different combination of enemies. The way the story was told and played was simple, but oh so effective, more effective than anything in the Halo series.

Halo 2 was a step-down, but still very solid. Bungie threw us a surprise by being able to play as the Arbiter, and that gave us a whole new perspective. Not only did it help gave us an even bigger variety of environments, but being to go to places and do things in a totally different fashion than if you were the Chief. Both missions where you needed to go after the Heretic leader were ominous, and flying a Banshee around the station or cutting the station was exciting. Feeling the Covenant invasion on Earth aboard the Cairo station was great, as well as seeing the major Covenant forces on Earth with the scarab and all. Going for a second time on an Halo ring felt great, and its different and appealing environment was great too, with the underwater section or Mayan-y style. The atmosphere on the Sacred Icon and Quarantine missions was also hard to beat. And despite playing as the Chief and the Arbiter across the galaxy, it still managed to keep to a certain degree the more intimate feel of Halo CE (which is a good thing ODST has), particularly in the cinematic style, rather than feeling like watching a movie like in Halo 3. Long missions helped it too as in the first game, giving you a better feel of progression and playing as a character, rather than having a pacing all over the place as in Reach, or playing every character of the ODST squad for a brief period of time.

ODST’s campaign was definately my favorite. One thing that I really liked was the visor feature that highlighted your enemies.

I would say ODST has by far the best story and charcter development. I have to disagree with “best campaign” statement. I couldn’t choose between Halo CE and ODST. Halo CE had the best and the most iconic mood of them all, guerilla war against the Covenant on a mysterious ring construct. Halo CE also had a very good soundtrack. Then again, as I said, ODST clearly had the best story and character development. Those two come pretty close to me as the best campaign experience.