Question on how many shots until you die

Greetings.

Im new to Halo, i played Halo 4 last year, single player only, and yesterday i installed MCC to try the multiplayer. Im more of a CoD player, but im thinking on skipping it this year and getting Halo 5 instead.

However one thing i thought, playing the Halo 4 mp in MCC, is that you have to unload the clip before an opponent dies (not to mention the whole dancing in order to try to dodge bullets). Ill be playing for the week in order to try to get used to it, but really i thought this is a MAJOR downside for the game and perhaps one of the main reasons CoD is the bestseller fps.

So my question basically is: do you still need to hit so many shots before you kill? Does the game have at least a mode without the shields? How is this thing in Halo 5?

This is actually one of Halo’s main distinctions from modern shooters, and thus, no, it ain’t going nowhere, pal. However, in H5, kill times are actually a bit faster than usual, still nowhere near CoD levels, but the SMG certainly clears house a lot better than ever before.
If you want to play with no/reduced shields, try SWAT or Breakout.

Halo online MP will always have SWAT, shieldless slaying! It is always one of the most consistently populated playlists.
As for a much quicker pace of killing in shielded gametypes, the best times to kill have changed by a degree of feeling but not enough to consciously think about it from H4. The average killing times of weapons have been lowered due to reliability over range being much better than ever before to a point where it’s game specific on the feeling of change.

If you go from CE to H5, you won’t notice much of a difference in pace of killing. If you go from CE to H3, you will notice a HUGE difference in pace of killing.

OK thanks for the input.

OP what you are experiencing is the difference in style, CoD is who shoots first wins because every gun kills in like 4 bullets but in halo he who aims better wins. because yes you have to keep your aim on them while they dodge about but so do they as you dodge about, then of course you have to be able to compensate for your own movement as well.

power weapons generally kill in 1 shot, sometimes 2 depending on the weapon and/or your aim. tier two weapons kill fast or have something extra to them than just bullets, the needler for example tracks enemies while the saw just eats people. tier one weapons are the all round weapons, the sort you respawn with and can use reliably but always look to upgrade given a chance.

also unlike in H4 the weapons sandbox in H5 is much better balanced, in h4 you can get away with using a BR/DMR 90% of the time. in the beta for h5 close range would see anything short of a perfect 5shot kill with the BR loose to the AR.

if i was you and im not so make up your own mind on this… i would get both halo and cod as they’re different types of shooter, one is a twitchy shoot first to win arcade game, the other is a more paced skill challenge, also CoD has a decent co-op mode in zombies and treyarch have proven, that of all the CoD studios, they do zombies best

As above, this is exactly what makes Halo different from other games, and in our opinion, makes more fun rather than just whoever has the fastest twitch response gets the kill.
Definitely a lot faster kill times than previous Halo games, but it’s still not instant or one shot (except with the sniper)

Definitely get some Halo 4 played on the MCC as it’s probably the closest you can get to Halo 5 so you’ll be ready :slight_smile:

To clarify what Shurifire said, SWAT and Breakout are two gametypes in Halo 5 (SWAT is also in the Master Chief Collection, I do believe). With SWAT, everyone is shield-less and spawns with a precision weapon (capable of a one-hit-kill with headshots).

As for Breakout, it has shields but they’re noticeably weaker than normal. In Breakout, there are no respawns, but rather several rounds to every match (much like Execution in Gears, Trials of Osiris in Destiny, and Counter-Strike).

> 2533274936958314;1:
> Greetings.
>
> Im new to Halo, i played Halo 4 last year, single player only, and yesterday i installed MCC to try the multiplayer. Im more of a CoD player, but im thinking on skipping it this year and getting Halo 5 instead.
>
> However one thing i thought, playing the Halo 4 mp in MCC, is that you have to unload the clip before an opponent dies (not to mention the whole dancing in order to try to dodge bullets). Ill be playing for the week in order to try to get used to it, but really i thought this is a MAJOR downside for the game and perhaps one of the main reasons CoD is the bestseller fps.
>
> So my question basically is: do you still need to hit so many shots before you kill? Does the game have at least a mode without the shields? How is this thing in Halo 5?

Welcome to Halo Spartan! Halo has generally taken more skill than Call Of Duty due to needing to be more accurate more often and be able to maneuver at the same time. You can’t just run at the enemy and shoot, you need to plan your shots, know where to shoot with each weapons and know how and where to move. And most of all you need to rely on your team. Basically the high time to kill is an upside, creating a greater skill gap and need to play strategically and develop skill, rather than relying on shooting first or having a better weapon. There is SWAT but beware, it is headshot nation there and takes some getting used to. Also sorry for being nit picky but it’s a magazine, not a clip.

Yep, you can’t just spray a few shots at the enemy in halo and win, you have to either outduel them, or pile on damage with the help of teammates.

Also know that Headshots don’t count for extra damage until the shield is down (except for sniper rifle and beam rifle which is always 1 shot kill to the head, or 2 shot kill to the body). This means that you generally want to aim center mass until you see the shield pop off and then go for the headshot.

The flash when the shield breaks is a visual indicator that the player is “one shot” meaning one headshot with a precision weapon will kill them.

Full auto weapons never get headshot bonuses so aim for the center.

This is a big plus for Halo. The TTK(time to kill) is much greater than CoD or Battlefield, which is why Halo takes so much skill. If you become a good Halo player, it will carry over to almost any other shooter. However, gamers who are good at other shooters aren’t usually good at Halo.

Ah the joy of listening to a CoD player trying to play Halo and not knowing anything about it… pretty much what everyone else said.

Indeed, I got jumped bad hehe.

Again thank you all for the useful information.

Ill just add a few things based on the answers you guys provided.

Just when i started the first multiplayer yesterday, the first thing that came to mind, immediately, was: this is just like unreal tournament 1999 (yes, im old). That was a great FPS multiplayer game and thats one of the main reasons i got even more interested on Halo.

As it was in Halo, sometimes you had to hit a lot of shots on the adversaries to kill them. It also required a lot of skills, however, at least for me, i dont know if others have this same problem, aiming with the mouse and moving with WASD on the keyboard is considerably easier than doing it with the controller, so no problems there.

That said, i remember when i got my hands in the first guitar hero. Some people were playing songs in the hardest setting. I thought that instead i waste time practicing to play guitar in this game, id rather get a real guitar and learn for real, which i did. With this in mind, im still wondering if I should invest time to develop a given skill, in this case, thumbs coordination, to play this game or if I should just stick with other games in which this sort of physical element is not so important. As I mentioned: im old, or at least too old for this type of practicing :frowning:

> 2533274866906624;10:
> This is a big plus for Halo. The TTK(time to kill) is much greater than CoD or Battlefield, which is why Halo takes so much skill. If you become a good Halo player, it will carry over to almost any other shooter. However, gamers who are good at other shooters aren’t usually good at Halo.

I actually disagree. I think different games demand different skill sets. Some skill sets transition well game-to-game. But Halo and COD have been a classic example of each game’s skill set not directly translating to the other. Tactical shooter v.s. twitch shooter don’t tend to blend their skill sets very well.

Halo is a slower time to kill game, with power weapons on map, which create a very team oriented experience, because two players isolating a single target makes a significant difference in TTK, and a team that obtains power weapons gains a meaningful advantage. Coordinating efforts, unselfish game play, communication, all shine brighter in Halo.

COD on the other hand is a short TTK game with a high focus on reaction time and player accuracy. There is little to no focus on teamwork, a 2v1 is only a nominal advantage. COD is the type of game that rewards an individual for their ability to aim quickly and accurately, and react instantly.

The generalization that Halo skill sets transition well to all games is simply not true. I would argue, that most Halo players that have never played a twitch shooter would struggle with the transition.

> 2610345319735860;13:
> > 2533274866906624;10:
> > This is a big plus for Halo. The TTK(time to kill) is much greater than CoD or Battlefield, which is why Halo takes so much skill. If you become a good Halo player, it will carry over to almost any other shooter. However, gamers who are good at other shooters aren’t usually good at Halo.
>
>
> I actually disagree. I think different games demand different skill sets. Some skill sets transition well game-to-game. But Halo and COD have been a classic example of each game’s skill set not directly translating to the other. Tactical shooter v.s. twitch shooter don’t tend to blend their skill sets very well.
>
> Halo is a slower time to kill game, with power weapons on map, which create a very team oriented experience, because two players isolating a single target makes a significant difference in TTK, and a team that obtains power weapons gains a meaningful advantage. Coordinating efforts, unselfish game play, communication, all shine brighter in Halo.
>
> COD on the other hand is a short TTK game with a high focus on reaction time and player accuracy. There is little to no focus on teamwork, a 2v1 is only a nominal advantage. COD is the type of game that rewards and individual for their ability to aim quickly and accurately, and react instantly.
>
> The generalization that Halo skill sets transition well to all games is simply not true. I would argue, that most Halo players that have never played a twitch shooter would struggle with the transition.

I agree with you about different skill sets needed for different games, but if you are good in a more challenging game like Halo you will probably be better a Cod rather than vice verse since Halo just naturally requires you to improve- it sets the bar high for skill. Example- I’m decent at Halo but whenever I play Cod over at a friends house I do really good even though I almost never play Cod, and part of that is good habits in Halo transitioning over; accuracy, working as a team, map control and movement. But when my friend comes over to my house and plays Halo with me I stomp him because Cod doesn’t generally teach you the same skills you would need in Halo, you don’t need pin point accuracy, communication or map control, they are good things to have in Cod but they aren’t required to be competitive. And just for the record, not saying I disagree, but Call Of Duty and Halo are not tactical shooters. Halo is more strategic then tactical, and Cod is a twitch shooter based on individual skill. Ghost Recon or Rainbow Six are tactical shooters.

> 2533274974597111;14:
> > 2610345319735860;13:
> > > 2533274866906624;10:
> > > This is a big plus for Halo. The TTK(time to kill) is much greater than CoD or Battlefield, which is why Halo takes so much skill. If you become a good Halo player, it will carry over to almost any other shooter. However, gamers who are good at other shooters aren’t usually good at Halo.
> >
> >
> > I actually disagree. I think different games demand different skill sets. Some skill sets transition well game-to-game. But Halo and COD have been a classic example of each game’s skill set not directly translating to the other. Tactical shooter v.s. twitch shooter don’t tend to blend their skill sets very well.
> >
> > Halo is a slower time to kill game, with power weapons on map, which create a very team oriented experience, because two players isolating a single target makes a significant difference in TTK, and a team that obtains power weapons gains a meaningful advantage. Coordinating efforts, unselfish game play, communication, all shine brighter in Halo.
> >
> > COD on the other hand is a short TTK game with a high focus on reaction time and player accuracy. There is little to no focus on teamwork, a 2v1 is only a nominal advantage. COD is the type of game that rewards and individual for their ability to aim quickly and accurately, and react instantly.
> >
> > The generalization that Halo skill sets transition well to all games is simply not true. I would argue, that most Halo players that have never played a twitch shooter would struggle with the transition.
>
>
> I agree with you about different skill sets needed for different games, but if you are good in a more challenging game like Halo you will probably be better a Cod rather than vice verse since Halo just naturally requires you to improve- it sets the bar high for skill. Example- I’m decent at Halo but whenever I play Cod over at a friends house I do really good even though I almost never play Cod, and part of that is good habits in Halo transitioning over; accuracy, working as a team, map control and movement. But when my friend comes over to my house and plays Halo with me I stomp him because Cod doesn’t generally teach you the same skills you would need in Halo, you don’t need pin point accuracy, communication or map control, they are good things to have in Cod but they aren’t required to be competitive. And just for the record, not saying I disagree, but Call Of Duty and Halo are not tactical shooters. Halo is more strategic then tactical, and Cod is a twitch shooter based on individual skill. Ghost Recon or Rainbow Six are tactical shooters.

I would say your one anecdotal story does not give justice to the different skill sets that COD demands v.s. Halo demands. Perhaps you are better at twitch shooters then you realize. Perhaps your friends are worse at twitch shooters then they realize. But COD absolutely demands pin point accuracy and reaction time. Players who can instantly snap their reticle on target hands-down dominate the entire space of COD. COD is a twitch shooter at its core, its basically a military styled quake.

Halo is absolutely a tactical shooter far more so then a strategic shooter. Sorry to get into semantics, but a strategy is about the big picture, that lays out a plan of execution for all the various tactics which are used over the course of time. Tactics are the implementation of the specific methods used to achieve a specific goal. E.g. A strategy is used to win a war, a tactic is used to insert into a combat location. Halo game play is dominated by tactics, how to acquire x power weapon, how to hold this map position, flank this person, communicate this player’s position, etc, are all tactics by nature. Don’t get me wrong, halo is also strategic, but most of the strategic side of Halo is only at the highest level of play. Where competitive teams come up with genuine plans on how they should implement various tactics over the course of an entire game. But generally speaking… Halo is a action packed tactical shooter.

BR = 4 shot kill
DMR = 5 shot kill
headshot with shields down of course.
I forget what the AR is currently at now. Your going to average kills times of about 1.2-1.5 seconds if you land all your shots. Compare that to CoD which has kill times of less than 0.5 seconds in most cases. Halo has a significantly higher skill gap than CoD and a good player will almost always beat a bad player. Halo does not pander to the weak like CoD does.

> 2533274936958314;1:
> Greetings.
>
> Im new to Halo, i played Halo 4 last year, single player only, and yesterday i installed MCC to try the multiplayer. Im more of a CoD player, but im thinking on skipping it this year and getting Halo 5 instead.
>
> However one thing i thought, playing the Halo 4 mp in MCC, is that you have to unload the clip before an opponent dies (not to mention the whole dancing in order to try to dodge bullets). Ill be playing for the week in order to try to get used to it, but really i thought this is a MAJOR downside for the game and perhaps one of the main reasons CoD is the bestseller fps.
>
> So my question basically is: do you still need to hit so many shots before you kill? Does the game have at least a mode without the shields? How is this thing in Halo 5?

Welcome to Halo. The superior FPS.

The longer time to kill means 1v1 engagements actually mean something. It means you can out-maneuver, out-aim, out-evade and out-smart your opponent while in CoD you just tap a trigger and kill him instantly with no chance of him outplaying you, no movement skill, no aiming skill and no intelligence.

CoD is a bestseller FPS because it is easy. Because it takes little to no effort to be good at it. Because the only thing a “good” CoD player has over a bad player is the ability to shoot slightly earlier. Most people prefer easy. Being good at Halo is hard. It takes skill which requires practice which means dedication. Games have become increasingly easier as the gaming industry grew more popular. Accessibility sells. Easy sells. CoD sells.

> 2533274913936758;17:
> > 2533274936958314;1:
> > Greetings.
> >
> > Im new to Halo, i played Halo 4 last year, single player only, and yesterday i installed MCC to try the multiplayer. Im more of a CoD player, but im thinking on skipping it this year and getting Halo 5 instead.
> >
> > However one thing i thought, playing the Halo 4 mp in MCC, is that you have to unload the clip before an opponent dies (not to mention the whole dancing in order to try to dodge bullets). Ill be playing for the week in order to try to get used to it, but really i thought this is a MAJOR downside for the game and perhaps one of the main reasons CoD is the bestseller fps.
> >
> > So my question basically is: do you still need to hit so many shots before you kill? Does the game have at least a mode without the shields? How is this thing in Halo 5?
>
>
> Welcome to Halo. The superior FPS.
>
> The longer time to kill means 1v1 engagements actually mean something. It means you can out-maneuver, out-aim, out-evade and out-smart your opponent while in CoD you just tap a trigger and kill him instantly with no chance of him outplaying you, no movement skill, no aiming skill and no intelligence.
>
> CoD is a bestseller FPS because it is easy. Because it takes little to no effort to be good at it. Because the only thing a “good” CoD player has over a bad player is the ability to shoot slightly earlier. Most people prefer easy. Being good at Halo is hard. It takes skill which requires practice which means dedication. Games have become increasingly easier as the gaming industry grew more popular. Accessibility sells. Easy sells. CoD sells.

You sir have put it perfectly into words.

> 2533274913936758;17:
> > 2533274936958314;1:
> > Greetings.
> >
> > Im new to Halo, i played Halo 4 last year, single player only, and yesterday i installed MCC to try the multiplayer. Im more of a CoD player, but im thinking on skipping it this year and getting Halo 5 instead.
> >
> > However one thing i thought, playing the Halo 4 mp in MCC, is that you have to unload the clip before an opponent dies (not to mention the whole dancing in order to try to dodge bullets). Ill be playing for the week in order to try to get used to it, but really i thought this is a MAJOR downside for the game and perhaps one of the main reasons CoD is the bestseller fps.
> >
> > So my question basically is: do you still need to hit so many shots before you kill? Does the game have at least a mode without the shields? How is this thing in Halo 5?
>
>
> Welcome to Halo. The superior FPS.
>
> The longer time to kill means 1v1 engagements actually mean something. It means you can out-maneuver, out-aim, out-evade and out-smart your opponent while in CoD you just tap a trigger and kill him instantly with no chance of him outplaying you, no movement skill, no aiming skill and no intelligence.
>
> CoD is a bestseller FPS because it is easy. Because it takes little to no effort to be good at it. Because the only thing a “good” CoD player has over a bad player is the ability to shoot slightly earlier. Most people prefer easy. Being good at Halo is hard. It takes skill which requires practice which means dedication. Games have become increasingly easier as the gaming industry grew more popular. Accessibility sells. Easy sells. CoD sells.

Oh my god you really are insufferable. Don’t worry we’re not all like him :stuck_out_tongue:

P.S He’s right. Just sift through the mother-superior tone.

My number one thing for new players is to just learn the maps. And what that really means is to just keep playing.

Halo is a game with so much room for different levels of skill and so much room for improvement - that improvement tends to come naturally.

Just keep playing, you’ll feel your aim, your movement, your radar awareness and your map knowledge all start to sync up.

It’s like riding a bike, one day it will just click and from there there’s no going back.