Psychology behind Sprint

Here are some psychological effects that might tie into the whole Sprint-debate – as a psychologist I hope you find you find it interesting:

Perception of speed
Irrespective of the question whether or not you’re actually getting somewhere faster (or if that is just an illusion) what’s important is the player’s perception of speed.
That perception is created through:

  • contrast between base speed and sprint speed
  • visual cues: shaking screen, rapid arm movements, flow of air (white stripes)
  • auditory cues: higher frequency of footsteps, rushing wind
  • kinesthetic cues: controller vibrations

Conditioning (Pavlov, Kornorski)
A previously neutral motoric action (pressing the left stick) becomes inherently rewarding by repeatedly linking it with (subjectively perceived) desired outcomes.
E.g. the player spawns and wants to get to the power weapon or back to his team as quick as possible. Pressing the left stick becomes rewarding (subjective perception of accelerating the progress) over time.

Motor (re-)learning (muscle memory)
I’ve gone into great detail why Sprint (and ADS) has become part of an (almost) ‘universal control scheme’ – i.e. that sprinting is in so many console shooters that pressing the left stick is highly associated with this mechanism (‘automatism’).
The problem is not that people can’t adjust to different settings; the problem is that it creates rough transitions especially for people that play a lot of others games/shooters.

Loss of reward = punishment
The loss of a reward (reinforcer) is always frustrating (punishment), even if the reward hasn’t yet materialized and is only expected.
If a player expects to get a certain kill because of his previous experiences (thus he expects to get this kill too), the loss of the reward (or the mental anticipation thereof) is highly frustrating.

Attribution theory (Weiner)
According to Weiner’s theory people try to determine the cause of an event (success / failure). Depending on that attribution there are different outcomes.
E.g. player shoots at enemy but can’t finish him off before he sprints to cover.
Attribution A (variable, controllable, internal): I wasn’t concentrated enough => will try better next time
Attribution B (stable, uncontrollable, external): Sprint makes it impossible to get that kill => frustration, helplessness

interesting…

o.O slow clap can’t exactly pinpoint whyy but I loved reading this.

I argue that your factors which you argue are significant for the perception of speed are quite insignificant.
Perception of speed has much more to do with references to your environment.

I.e.: 100 km/h feel much faster when you drive down an straight narrow alley than driving down a straight street on a large flat and empty field because there are no references on the large field, no relatable/known objects that will pass by.

Or as a Halo example for everyone to test for him/herself:
Load up Forge Island in H4. Then walk from one end to the other on that big flat rock. Then build an alley from on end to the other and walk through that. Then compare which way felt faster (even though it was technically the same).

However, therefore I would say, when it is really just about the perception of speed that is making classic Halo’s movement unattractive for the masses/modern market then the implementation of sprint is in absolutely no way necessary/ completely irrelevant to make movement attractive.
Making base movement feel fast, making it feel like an actual run instead of a jog, (i.e.: by increasing base speed a bit, increasing FoV appropriately, map design, etc) would already solve the issue here without having to throw fundamental and long established gameplay characteristics out of the window and go through unnecessary implementation tangles (like you have it with sprint in Halo).
Eventually when base movement would feel fast, when you would feel like running than you would eliminate the urge/reflex to move faster, to sprint in Halo, wouldn’t you?

On another note, since the argument for faster speed is often linked to immersion in the game, in the canon it says Spartans perceive their environment in some sort of slow motion because of their augmentations. So, wouldn’t that mean that Spartans themselves actually perceive their movement as slow and eventually, ironically, feeling slow even though you are unnatural fast would actually be immersive in regards to canon? :stuck_out_tongue:

> 2533274965837334;4:
> On another note, since the argument for faster speed is often linked to immersion in the game, in the canon it says Spartans perceive their environment in some sort of slow motion because of their augmentations. So, wouldn’t that mean that Spartans themselves actually perceive their movement as slow and eventually, ironically, feeling slow even though you are unnatural fast would actually be immersive in regards to canon? :stuck_out_tongue:

Well, in that case the same thing should happen in combat. Or any other part of gameplay. So still not in line with canon.

> 2533274963840114;5:
> > 2533274965837334;4:
> > On another note, since the argument for faster speed is often linked to immersion in the game, in the canon it says Spartans perceive their environment in some sort of slow motion because of their augmentations. So, wouldn’t that mean that Spartans themselves actually perceive their movement as slow and eventually, ironically, feeling slow even though you are unnatural fast would actually be immersive in regards to canon? :stuck_out_tongue:
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> Well, in that case the same thing should happen in combat. Or any other part of gameplay. So still not in line with canon.

Was more of a not-so-serious-argument in favor of classic Halo movement hence the smiley.

> 2533274965837334;6:
> > 2533274963840114;5:
> > > 2533274965837334;4:
> > > On another note, since the argument for faster speed is often linked to immersion in the game, in the canon it says Spartans perceive their environment in some sort of slow motion because of their augmentations. So, wouldn’t that mean that Spartans themselves actually perceive their movement as slow and eventually, ironically, feeling slow even though you are unnatural fast would actually be immersive in regards to canon? :stuck_out_tongue:
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Well, in that case the same thing should happen in combat. Or any other part of gameplay. So still not in line with canon.
>
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> Was more of a not-so-serious-argument in favor of classic Halo movement hence the smiley.

In the games though, we (spartan players) have been faster than the human NPCs. We “sprint” by tilting our analog as far as it can go but this doesn’t limit our inability to shoot as well, where as you see NPCs fire stationary or sometimes firing on a somewhat brisk walk motion. In fact I can only really recall Elites being able to move rather quickly while still firing and they are compared to Spartans yes?

> 2533274965837334;6:
> > 2533274963840114;5:
> > > 2533274965837334;4:
> > > On another note, since the argument for faster speed is often linked to immersion in the game, in the canon it says Spartans perceive their environment in some sort of slow motion because of their augmentations. So, wouldn’t that mean that Spartans themselves actually perceive their movement as slow and eventually, ironically, feeling slow even though you are unnatural fast would actually be immersive in regards to canon? :stuck_out_tongue:
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Well, in that case the same thing should happen in combat. Or any other part of gameplay. So still not in line with canon.
>
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> Was more of a not-so-serious-argument in favor of classic Halo movement hence the smiley.

Yeah… I kind of understood that. We also can’t move individual fingers. Not in line with canon.

I Agree On The Perception Of Speed Point, The Biggest ReasonI’m pro Sprint Is Because After Playing Reach And Four I feel Slow Without It When I Go Back To earlier entries.

> 2533274832607597;9:
> I Agree On The Perception Of Speed Point, The Biggest ReasonI’m pro Sprint Is Because After Playing Reach And Four I feel Slow Without It When I Go Back To earlier entries.

Halo 3 with 150 FoV

This doesn’t feel slow to me and this is just changing the FoV, if we also increased the movement speed that would actually speed up the game.

Op, where are you in this sprint-debate? Just wondering, are you in favour of sprint or do you want to see it gone?

> 2533274797967716;10:
> > 2533274832607597;9:
> > I Agree On The Perception Of Speed Point, The Biggest ReasonI’m pro Sprint Is Because After Playing Reach And Four I feel Slow Without It When I Go Back To earlier entries.
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> Halo 3 with 150 FoV
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> This doesn’t feel slow to me and this is just changing the FoV, if we also increased the movement speed that would actually speed up the game.

I know it’s not actually slow, but I feel Slow. But to be honest I don’t much care one way or the other.

> 2533274964143689;11:
> Op, where are you in this sprint-debate? Just wondering, are you in favour of sprint or do you want to see it gone?

It must be really confusing to read a thread for once that doesn’t give a clear picture of the OP’s agenda, right? :wink:

I’ll give you an answer: I’m on neither side. I want to make people think about the often complex reality of things, it’s never a black or white story regardless of what either ‘side’ wants you to believe.

And I believe that both sides are important for Halo’s future: The franchise both has to stay relevant for a new generation of players AND must not forget it’s roots in the process.

I would take Halo with or without Sprint. All I can say is that I really really enjoyed the H5 Beta :slight_smile: