Mendicant Bias and Halo 5

Please note that I have not read the entirety of any of the Halo books or comics, but my friend and I have an interesting theory for Halo 5: Guardians. The Halo 3 terminals feature messages sent between the Librarian and the Iso-Didact, which includes the Librarian talking about the Mantle of Responsibility. After playing Halo 4, I realized that many of these messages foreshadowed the events of Halo 4. I then started looking for clues that may have been foreshadowing Halo 5: Guardians. One of the first pieces I noticed was the Librarian’s direct use of the word, “Guardians,” which stands out highlighted in the terminal amongs the other words. She used Guardians when referring to the line the Forerunners had constructed. The line was basically a safety border. In the Ur-Didact’s alternate attempts to stop the flood (such as the Prometheans), he realized that it would be impossible to save those behind the line, for that area had already been entirely consumed by the Flood. The Librarian was behind that line, which was why the Didact put so much work into developing an alternate way to stop the flood, other than activating the Halo arrays.

Skip forward to the Halo 5 teasers, Spartan Locke refers to the Master Chief as a traitor. It appears that the game may take place on the planet Sangelios, homeworld to the elites, and if that is the case, the Flood may return. In the Halo Escalation comics, a tiny flood spore was shown on the Spirit of Fire ship, which was drifting towards a planet that looked like Sangelios. It’s said that even the to tiniest Flood spore could start an outbreak. Not only that, but 343’s new Hunt the Signal game revealed photos that resembled a Flood spore, further hinting towards the Flood’s return. Say that in Halo 5, there is an outbreak of the Flood on that planet. Master Chief may have had to become a “Guardian” and choose to get rid of the flood in a way that would wipe out the planet, sort of as if that planet was behind “the line.” Obviously Master Chief would never activate a Halo array (especially since the Librarian’s indexed seeds to repopulate humanity no longer exist), but that might not mean he doesn’t realize its too late to save that planet. Therefore, he makes a decision that brings havoc to that planet, but saves the rest of the galaxy. Agent Locke, not realizing why Master Chief did what he had to do, could easily refer to him as a traitor to the ones he was supposed to protect. This would make Master Chief one of the “Guardians” the Librarian was referring to.

Now, the next aspect is what choice the Master Chief made. Long ago, the Didact first tried to stop the Flood with Prometheans, which we learned in Halo 4. However, the Didact also tried one more additional solution before the Halo array was activated, as learned in Halo 3’s terminals. That solution was Mendicant Bias, a highly intelligent Foreunner AI occupying a colossal Forerunner robotic body. The Didact wanted to use Mendicant Bias to draw the Gravemind outside the line and kill him when he’s vulnerable. Unfortunately for the Didact, the Gravemind corrupted Mendicant Bias’s mind and turned him against the Forerunners. As a result, the AI of Mendicant Bias was fragmented while the body was buried beneath a sandy area. The fragments of Mendicant Bias’s AI were located on the Ark and the Covenant’s holy city of High Charity. When High Charity travels to the Ark in Halo 3, the AI repairs itself and brings itself back together again. It then directly communicates with Chief through the Halo 3 terminals, saying that he was sorry for everything he did and that he would help Chief in any way he could. He even had direct contact with Cortana when she was trapper aboard High Charity.

Skip ahead again to the Halo 5 2013 e3 promo, we see Chief standing before a colossal Forerunner robot rising from beneath the sands. If you read the description of Mendicant Bias’s body when it is buried, you’ll realize that the Forerunner creature in the promo greatly resembles the detailed body of Mendicant Bias when it was buried. Knowing that he couldn’t activate a Halo array, the Master Chief may have released Mendicant Bias on Sangelios in a desperate attempt to stop the Flood. The latest Halo 5 poster shows that same giant robot figure standing upon the ruins of a colony city. It’s possible that Chief unleashed Mendicant Bias on Sangelios so that he could destroy the Flood, but he also destroy Sangelios in the process. Not realizing why, Angent Locke may just know Chief to be the traitor that destroyed Sangelios. The Halo 3 terminals talked a lot about Mendicant Bias, and after everything the terminals foreshadowed for Halo 4 with the Librarian and Didact, it wouldn’t make sense if Mendicant Bias didn’t show up at some point. Not only this, but the Halo 2: Anniversary terminals also talked about Mendicant Bias, further forshadowing his return. All of this fits perfectly with the teasers of Halo 5: Guardians. The fact that Mendicant Bias repaired himself from rampancy, a capability he claimed that only truly strong AIs could possess, also parallels the story of Cortana and how she actually did die from rampancy. Maybe Mendicant Bias also knows a way to restore Cortana, further giving more reasons as to why Master Chief may be dealing with him. I honestly think that there is a very strong possibility that this will be the setup of Halo 5: Guardians. Does anyone think I may be on to something?

It’s more than a common theory that it’s mendicant bias we saw in the teaser and I do believe in it.
About your previous speculating, I think it’s too far-fetched.

You probably right but actually time will tell. One thing is sure: that bird in the 2013 E3 trailer is not a war sphinx, so that’s why I think you’re right. I’m very hope that he will show up in Halo 5, I would gladly meet with him, since the cryptic messages from Halo 2 soundtrack.

> 2533274820441404;2:
> It’s more than a common theory that it’s mendicant bias we saw in the teaser and I do believe in it.
> About your previous speculating, I think it’s too far-fetched.

Yeah, you’re right about it being too far-fetched. My theory goes really deep XD At the very least, though, I think we can all expect Mendicant Bias to be the villain of Halo 5.

> 2533274903775647;1:
> One of the first pieces I noticed was the Librarian’s direct use of the word, “Guardians,” which stands out highlighted in the terminal amongs the other words. She used Guardians when referring to the line the Forerunners had constructed. The line was basically a safety border. In the Ur-Didact’s alternate attempts to stop the flood (such as the Prometheans), he realized that it would be impossible to save those behind the line, for that area had already been entirely consumed by the Flood. The Librarian was behind that line, which was why the Didact put so much work into developing an alternate way to stop the flood, other than activating the Halo arrays.

Sorry OP, I stopped reading after this part.

That line wasn’t called “Guardians” or anything of the sort; it was called the “Maginot Line” or “Maginot Sphere”. It’s unclear whether this line was physical or metaphysical, but it is clear that it represented the border between the area of space that was still defensible and the further parts of space that were lost to the Flood. The Librarian was doing most of her lifework beyond the reaches of the Maginot Line, of which the Didact did not approve as it compromised her safety.

The Librarian’s personal safety had little bearing on the Didact’s motivation to find an alternative way to stop the Flood, as his primary incentive was his utter refusal to abandon the Forerunner’s hold of the Mantle of Responsibility. He knew that firing the Halo Array would wipe out the Forerunners, along with all other sentient life, which would forfeit their power as holders of the Mantle.

Side note: The bird-like Forerunner Construct from the E3 presentation and the Halo 5 cover art is most likely a Guardian Sentinel, hence the title “Halo 5: Guardians”.

> 2533274810150284;5:
> > 2533274903775647;1:
> > One of the first pieces I noticed was the Librarian’s direct use of the word, “Guardians,” which stands out highlighted in the terminal amongs the other words. She used Guardians when referring to the line the Forerunners had constructed. The line was basically a safety border. In the Ur-Didact’s alternate attempts to stop the flood (such as the Prometheans), he realized that it would be impossible to save those behind the line, for that area had already been entirely consumed by the Flood. The Librarian was behind that line, which was why the Didact put so much work into developing an alternate way to stop the flood, other than activating the Halo arrays.
>
>
> Sorry OP, I stopped reading after this part.
>
> That line wasn’t called “Guardians” or anything of the sort; it was called the “Maginot Line” or “Maginot Sphere”. It’s unclear whether this line was physical or metaphysical, but it is clear that it represented the border between the area of space that was still defensible and the further parts of space that were lost to the Flood. The Librarian was doing most of her lifework beyond the reaches of the Maginot Line, of which the Didact did not approve as it compromised her safety.
>
> The Librarian’s personal safety had little bearing on the Didact’s motivation to find an alternative way to stop the Flood, as his primary incentive was his utter refusal to abandon the Forerunner’s hold of the Mantle of Responsibility. He knew that firing the Halo Array would wipe out the Forerunners, along with all other sentient life, which would forfeit their power as holders of the Mantle.
>
> Side note: The bird-like Forerunner Construct from the E3 presentation and the Halo 5 cover art is most likely a Guardian Sentinel, hence the title “Halo 5: Guardians”.

I didn’t mean that the line was called Guardians. I meant that the Forerunners were considered Guardians for forgetting about the lives behind the line so that the rest of the galaxy may be protected. I’m sorry for making that confusing. And yes, I suppose you’re right about the Didact caring more about not giving up the mantle, but the dialogue between him and the Librarian in the Halo 3 terminals undoubtedly shows that the Librarian being behind the line was a small factor of his intent not to activate the Halo array. Honestly, though, I really don’t think the owl is a Guaridan Sentinel. Even if it isn’t Mendicant Bias, the Librarian’s very noticeable and bolded reference to calling the holders of the mantle Guardians definitely means that the Guardians being referred to in Halo 5 are the Reclaimers that are destined to take up the mantle, aka Chief, Locke, and humanity. The official line from the terminal is below:

"L: The Mantle. You still hold to that [fairy tale] after all that has happened? After this thing has consumed a million worlds?

Can’t you see? Belief in the Mantle sealed our doom! Weakened our [protectorates], bred dependence and sloth. Our [so-called Guardianship] has stripped those we would keep safe of any capacity for self-defense!

Were we such noble [Guardians] when we drew our line and abandoned billions to the parasite?"

This quote must mean that the galaxy’s new Guardians in Halo 5 must choose whether or not to follow the lead of the forerunners and abandon those left behind the line, or act differently and find a way to stop the parasite without giving up the galaxy. I think both Locke and Chief will be on opposite sides of this choice. Releasing Mendicant Bias could be his way of saving those behind the line without activating a Halo array. Although, I could be completely wrong in every way XD

> 2533274903775647;6:
> I didn’t mean that the line was called Guardians. I meant that the Forerunners were considered Guardians for forgetting about the lives behind the line so that the rest of the galaxy may be protected. I’m sorry for making that confusing. And yes, I suppose you’re right about the Didact caring more about not giving up the mantle, but the dialogue between him and the Librarian in the Halo 3 terminals undoubtedly shows that the Librarian being behind the line was a small factor of his intent not to activate the Halo array. Honestly, though, I really don’t think the owl is a Guaridan Sentinel. Even if it isn’t Mendicant Bias, the Librarian’s very noticeable and bolded reference to calling the holders of the mantle Guardians definitely means that the Guardians being referred to in Halo 5 are the Reclaimers that are destined to take up the mantle, aka Chief, Locke, and humanity. The official line from the terminal is below:
>
> “L: The Mantle. You still hold to that [fairy tale] after all that has happened? After this thing has consumed a million worlds?
>
> Can’t you see? Belief in the Mantle sealed our doom! Weakened our [protectorates], bred dependence and sloth. Our [so-called Guardianship] has stripped those we would keep safe of any capacity for self-defense!
>
> Were we such noble [Guardians] when we drew our line and abandoned billions to the parasite?”
>
> This quote must mean that the galaxy’s new Guardians in Halo 5 must choose whether or not to follow the lead of the forerunners and abandon those left behind the line, or act differently and find a way to stop the parasite without giving up the galaxy. I think both Locke and Chief will be on opposite sides of this choice. Releasing Mendicant Bias could be his way of saving those behind the line without activating a Halo array. Although, I could be completely wrong in every way XD

I do understand what you mean about the Librarian using the terms “guardians” and “guardianship”, but I don’t put as much significance on her use of the term. The holders of Mantle are protectors of the galaxy, and “guardian” is, of course, a synonym for “protector”. It’s a basic writing technique to not use the same words over and over again, so I don’t get the same vibe that you do from her use of the word.

She was basically saying their belief in the Mantle caused all the other species to become dependent on the Forerunners’ military strength, and when that strength proved to be inadequate to defeat the Flood, the other worlds had no means to defend themselves, and so were lost to the Flood. The Forerunners were supposed to protect all other life, and their pride led them to make the other worlds “put all their eggs in the Forerunner basket”, so to speak. The Librarian is saying that by being so prideful in their role as protectors, they actually failed to protect the other worlds, and doomed them to the Flood. She was remarking on the cruel irony of the situation.

None of that dialogue points to Mendicant Bias, so I think bringing him into the mix just muddied up the theory. Do I think Mendicant Bias will be back at some point? Yes. Do I think he could be in Halo 5 in some capacity? Yes. Do I put much stock in any of the theories revolving around him? No, not really. Not when there are perfectly plausible alternate explanations that don’t require making as many assumptions (Occam’s razor).

> 2533274810150284;7:
> > 2533274903775647;6:
> > I didn’t mean that the line was called Guardians. I meant that the Forerunners were considered Guardians for forgetting about the lives behind the line so that the rest of the galaxy may be protected. I’m sorry for making that confusing. And yes, I suppose you’re right about the Didact caring more about not giving up the mantle, but the dialogue between him and the Librarian in the Halo 3 terminals undoubtedly shows that the Librarian being behind the line was a small factor of his intent not to activate the Halo array. Honestly, though, I really don’t think the owl is a Guaridan Sentinel. Even if it isn’t Mendicant Bias, the Librarian’s very noticeable and bolded reference to calling the holders of the mantle Guardians definitely means that the Guardians being referred to in Halo 5 are the Reclaimers that are destined to take up the mantle, aka Chief, Locke, and humanity. The official line from the terminal is below:
> >
> > “L: The Mantle. You still hold to that [fairy tale] after all that has happened? After this thing has consumed a million worlds?
> >
> > Can’t you see? Belief in the Mantle sealed our doom! Weakened our [protectorates], bred dependence and sloth. Our [so-called Guardianship] has stripped those we would keep safe of any capacity for self-defense!
> >
> > Were we such noble [Guardians] when we drew our line and abandoned billions to the parasite?”
> >
> > This quote must mean that the galaxy’s new Guardians in Halo 5 must choose whether or not to follow the lead of the forerunners and abandon those left behind the line, or act differently and find a way to stop the parasite without giving up the galaxy. I think both Locke and Chief will be on opposite sides of this choice. Releasing Mendicant Bias could be his way of saving those behind the line without activating a Halo array. Although, I could be completely wrong in every way XD
>
>
> I do understand what you mean about the Librarian using the terms “guardians” and “guardianship”, but I don’t put as much significance on her use of the term. The holders of Mantle are protectors of the galaxy, and “guardian” is, of course, a synonym for “protector”. It’s a basic writing technique to not use the same words over and over again, so I don’t get the same vibe that you do from her use of the word.
>
> She was basically saying their belief in the Mantle caused all the other species to become dependent on the Forerunners’ military strength, and when that strength proved to be inadequate to defeat the Flood, the other worlds had no means to defend themselves, and so were lost to the Flood. The Forerunners were supposed to protect all other life, and their pride led them to make the other worlds “put all their eggs in the Forerunner basket”, so to speak. The Librarian is saying that by being so prideful in their role as protectors, they actually failed to protect the other worlds, and doomed them to the Flood. She was remarking on the cruel irony of the situation.
>
> None of that dialogue points to Mendicant Bias, so I think bringing him into the mix just muddied up the theory. Do I think Mendicant Bias will be back at some point? Yes. Do I think he could be in Halo 5 in some capacity? Yes. Do I put much stock in any of the theories revolving around him? No, not really. Not when there are perfectly plausible alternate explanations that don’t require making as many assumptions (Occam’s razor).

True, you are very right. One mention of Guardian isn’t enough to justify what the Guardians are in Halo 5. I think Mendicant Bias will show up at some point during the Reclaimer Saga, but I’ll just leave it at that. My theory is way too complicated, and Halo 5 would never be that bizzare with so many assumptions. Either way, though, I’m super excited for the game! Halo was the first FPS video game I ever played, and I downright fell in love with it. All these years later, it’s still my favorite series.

> 2533274903775647;8:
> True, you are very right. One mention of Guardian isn’t enough to justify what the Guardians are in Halo 5. I think Mendicant Bias will show up at some point during the Reclaimer Saga, but I’ll just leave it at that. My theory is way too complicated, and Halo 5 would never be that bizzare with so many assumptions. Either way, though, I’m super excited for the game! Halo was the first FPS video game I ever played, and I downright fell in love with it. All these years later, it’s still my favorite series.

This, we can agree on.

And here’s the doctor with his surprising knowledge in lore. I did not know of that Doc. Where did you learn all this?

> 2535464740959821;10:
> And here’s the doctor with his surprising knowledge in lore. I did not know of that Doc. Where did you learn all this?

Games first, then expanded media. Plus occasional diving excursions on Halo wikis. I get around.

> 2533274810150284;11:
> > 2535464740959821;10:
> > And here’s the doctor with his surprising knowledge in lore. I did not know of that Doc. Where did you learn all this?
>
>
> Games first, then expanded media. Plus occasional diving excursions on Halo wikis. I get around.

Buy any of the books or did you just look at the summaries of the books?

> 2535464740959821;12:
> > 2533274810150284;11:
> > > 2535464740959821;10:
> > > And here’s the doctor with his surprising knowledge in lore. I did not know of that Doc. Where did you learn all this?
> >
> >
> > Games first, then expanded media. Plus occasional diving excursions on Halo wikis. I get around.
>
>
> Buy any of the books or did you just look at the summaries of the books?

Borrowed most of the books from a friend, and actually found some free-to-read around the internet. A few of the books I couldn’t muddle through because the writing was atrocious (I think it was the Kilo-5 Trilogy and one or two other books) so I checked out detailed summaries and supplemented that with a wiki dive.

> 2533274810150284;13:
> > 2535464740959821;12:
> > > 2533274810150284;11:
> > > > 2535464740959821;10:
> > > > And here’s the doctor with his surprising knowledge in lore. I did not know of that Doc. Where did you learn all this?
> > >
> > >
> > > Games first, then expanded media. Plus occasional diving excursions on Halo wikis. I get around.
> >
> >
> > Buy any of the books or did you just look at the summaries of the books?
>
>
> Borrowed most of the books from a friend, and actually found some free-to-read around the internet. A few of the books I couldn’t muddle through because the writing was atrocious (I think it was the Kilo-5 Trilogy and one or two other books) so I checked out detailed summaries and supplemented that with a wiki dive.

Ah, that’s good. I only ever read the summary and wiki of the three books before Halo 4. I think Cryptum and Primordium and such. Starting to read those.