Make armor practical again

A lot of the armor in Halo 4 sacrificed its practicality with the sole purpose of trying to look aesthetically pleasing (which, IMO most weren’t). This left a significant amount of areas exposed to fire, which defeats the purpose of the armor. A super soldier needs super protection. 343 should design H5’s armor sets with this in mind. We’ve already seen an improvement with addition of the space diaper to the Mark VI armor (hell yes!). But some of the other armors left the chest a bit exposed (Aviator I believe was one of them). I also wouldn’t mind the addition of armor attachments. On an unrelated note, PLEASE BRING BACK ARMOR EFFECTS.

Among other things, (attachment-related) I would like to see mag pouches and grenade belts return, in addition to the combat knife being visible again as well.

They seem to come from thin air these days… If recent Spartan armors weren’t focused on being so busy and jagged-edged, they could probably add these things again, and without making each Spartan 50,000 polygons each. I remember a time when the silhouette of a Spartan had so much clarity, that you could actually envision taking it apart. Every detail was more clear-cut…

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> Among other things, (attachment-related) I would like to see mag pouches and grenade belts return, in addition to the combat knife being visible again as well.
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> They seem to come from thin air these days… If recent Spartan armors weren’t focused on being so busy and jagged-edged, they could probably add these things again, and without making each Spartan 50,000 polygons each. The silhouette of a Spartan used to have much more clarity… It was more clear-cut…

It seems they’re changing this. A couple of the new armor sets were pretty simple but really cool AHEM ATHLON AHEM.

They just seemed so uninspired. Pioneer looked like someone was told to meet a quota on armor designs and designed something intentionally hideous to spite their boss. I would like attachments, but I would not want anything excessive, as the grenade belt looked like someone has glue a sixpack to themselves. The soldier armor in halo 4 had packs on the front, I would like something like that, as you could see them, but they weren’t -Yoinking!- purses strapped all over the place like a final fantasy character as was prone to happen in reach. The athlon armor looked really good though, so I’m hopeful that they know what people want now; simple shapes, angular curves, and an incredible silhouette that isn’t confusing and jagged to look at.

Firstly, OP, your gamer tag is immaculate.

More to the point, though, I agree. Halo 4’s armor was aesthetically ridiculous and frankly quite implausible. None of the customization options really looked particularly functional. Sure, there were more options than a player would know what to do with, but it failed to impress me due to the fact that I was essentially choosing between a plethora of helmets and armor configurations that really had no individual personality or added any significant aesthetic uniqueness to my Spartan. In short, it was quantity over quality.

Reach had a good selection, as well, but it’s options were far more diverse. Every piece looked like it had its own set of benefits and drawbacks- And you could suit your Spartan up in a way that complimented your unique personality and hinted at your preferred playstyle. Additions like wristwear and utility went miles in furthering this, as well as a few different variants of every helmet. The implementation of a cR system also ensured some commitment to your armor of choice; you couldn’t just switch up your entire set of armor on whimsy as you pleased. No, you had to pour hard-earned credits into every piece you owned. That, to me, made the armory a very gratifying experience that worked in a synergistic way with the rest of the game.

Simply giving the armor away by level doesn’t inspire any sense of worth in any particular piece or set. After all, anyone can make it to SR130 if they just put the time into it. Reach offered each player their own decision in what armor they were gong to invest in, and the armor looked functional and battle-ready. Halo 4, however, handed out a cookie-cutter armory that provided an incredible volume of options, but few actually desirable sets. And even of those few, most didn’t look at all practical. Here’s hoping Halo 5 gets it right before launch.