I have a question about 60fps

We all know Halo 5 is getting 60fps, but what does that mean? Does it mean that it will be like The Hobbit where it looks faster in the rate of the look? Now if it does, I have some problems with high frame rate (The Hobbit at least). Does the 60fps mean the look will be faster looking than previous Halo games or does it mean something else?

It means more pictures are being taken on the screen, showing more frames of movement. Cod runs at 60 fps, while halo runs at 30. Most games will likely be 60 frames on next gen consoles. Halo 5 will be twice as smooth as previous titles.

It means you’re getting crisp movement without motion blur.

Cinema presents unique problems in that they are using sets, props, and makeup that don’t look as good when you get a more crisp picture.

The 48 fps in the Hobbit was the first attempt to integrate it in a media that had been standard at 24 fps for… I believe 90 years. Decades worth of stylistic tricks and standards suddenly don’t hold up. 48 fps is the future of cinema, but it will take them some time to figure out the new tricks of the trade.

Video games are a different issue. Its a digitally produced image. No props. No sets. It’ll look fine.

^See above^

Basically what 60 fps means is that you get a far more fluid image on your screen (less motion blur, fewer perceptible changes in framerate), making the game much, much more immersive. If you’ve ever played some of the more recent Call of Duty titles, you’ll definitely know what I mean.

The basic premise is that it lowers another barrier between the player and the game, as while the human eye has no definable “framerate”, it can still detect the missing “in-between” images when there’s a lot of action going on.

> ^See above^
>
> Basically what 60 fps means is that you get a far more fluid image on your screen (less motion blur, fewer perceptible changes in framerate), making the game much, much more immersive. If you’ve ever played some of the more recent Call of Duty titles, you’ll definitely know what I mean.
>
> The basic premise is that it lowers another barrier between the player and the game, as while the human eye has no definable “framerate”, it can still detect the missing “in-between” images when there’s a lot of action going on.

For practical effect I believe the human eye (for most people) operates somewhere in the range of 60 fps.

Obviously its not TECHNICALLY what is happening, but that is apparently the threshhold where mental strain of trying to fill in the in between drops to almost nothing.

That’s part of the reason that they are pushing 48 fps in cinema. The 24 fps frame rate in 3d gives many people headaches from the visual/mental strain of trying to process the information that is there while filtering out the information that isn’t.

I believe that’s also the reasno that many games recommend not ramping up your fps above 60 in computer gaming. There simply isn’t an incentive to go higher.