How many of y'all have worked in software?

Not trying to be snarky – trying to get a legitimate gauge of how many people have ever worked for a software company, either in or close to product/engineering. (I work in tech)

> 2533274902478287;1:
> Not trying to be snarky – trying to get a legitimate gauge of how many people have ever worked for a software company, either in or close to product/engineering.

I made some redstone creations on Minecraft.

I also made a killball machine on Halo Reach that constantly blows stuff up leaving debris everywhere.

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yeee

I work closely with a small software team (not videogame related) at work, but not directly myself. I have also created games for school programming projects (group) in college and made hobby-level (solo) games in my spare time.

I have a good understanding of game mechanics on a software level and a reasonable understanding of software production/support, but I wouldn’t say i have a good idea of what happens within AAA game/software companies like 343i.

I work at a small software company. I studied game design and production in university but never got a chance to actually work in that industry. Honestly given the stories I hear about AAA game companies, I’m kind of happy I didn’t.

> 2533274917301945;4:
> I work closely with a small software team (not videogame related) at work, but not directly myself. I have also created games for school programming projects (group) in college and made hobby-level (solo) games in my spare time.
>
> I have a good understanding of game mechanics on a software level and a reasonable understanding of software production/support, but I wouldn’t say i have a good idea of what happens within AAA game/software companies like 343i.

This is similar to where my knowledge is – except for the hobby making games. Mine are just playing them and playing bass guitar lol.

I have never, and that is why I keep my feedback realistic enough from what I know. I see many claims around the community, saying “it is just that easy to fix” or “why 343 can’t just do that?”.
I’m not by any means disregarding the critiques, I think if we have a problem with something we have to tell 343, but I certainly know that to make a change or not make a change is way more complex and deep than we think. A single change can affect how the entire game behaves. I remember in Halo 5 a large criticism was about the REQs UI: “why can’t we have a simple option to sell many REQs at once?” A developper responded to that on a blog post on Waypoint that they are aware of this is an issue, but they had limitations that the options to sell more REQs were not possible.

People with no dev experience would be amazed at how something seemingly trivial can end up being a massive undertaking. That goes for any kind of development, web, games, cloud etc.

> 2533274817078719;8:
> People with no dev experience would be amazed at how something seemingly trivial can end up being a massive undertaking. That goes for any kind of development, web, games, cloud etc.

Oh yeah, “just change the engine” has got to be my favorite. Accompanied by those who see ports of assets to like UE4 with the settings cranked so high that the porter’s super-mega computer is having framerate issues and point to that saying how easy and better the game can look.

> 2533275010793662;7:
> I have never, and that is why I keep my feedback realistic enough from what I know. I see many claims around the community, saying “it is just that easy to fix” or “why 343 can’t just do that?”.
> I’m not by any means disregarding the critiques, I think if we have a problem with something we have to tell 343, but I certainly know that to make a change or not make a change is way more complex and deep than we think. A single change can affect how the entire game behaves. I remember in Halo 5 a large criticism was about the REQs UI: “how can’t we have a simple option to sell many REQs at once?” A developper responded to that on a blog post on Waypoint that they are aware of this is an issue, but they had limitations that the options to sell more REQs were not possible.

I can’t do more genuinely opinion about it, but I could give you some sort of view:
Having to learn two languages and memorizing many lines of code isn’t for me in that time. I remember I programmed a few times, but most of the time it gave me many errors or did not run correctly. A constant headache for trying to make just one simple thing work.
Dealing with 3D it isn’t difficult, but it’s slow. Learning not only how to handle different tools and take care of details, but also having a good machine to run and store content to make excellent quality it’s very complicated. And know about this stuff alone isn’t enough to get a job: you need to build a good portfolio and learn some coding to make better and more complex 3D art.
Getting in to this area needs much more dedicated time and I prefer a job that is steady, constant and doesn’t need to be updated or doesn’t need a lot of constant learning.

> 2533274902478287;1:
> Not trying to be snarky – trying to get a legitimate gauge of how many people have ever worked for a software company, either in or close to product/engineering. (I work in tech)

I went to school for game design (3D modeling and animation)

Here’s a link for someone who works and teaches the stuff with a very detailed breakdown about why in fact Infinite does not look good, for those interested in a more professional analysis: Let's Talk About Those Graphics... | An Environment Artist's Layman's Explanation | Halo: Infinite - YouTube

I work in IT supporting server infrastructure as a systems/application admin. I have an understanding of software development, and have done some scripting with bash/Python, but am by no means a software developer. I’ve seen firsthand however, how complex even just Web development can be, and I realized it wasn’t for me lol
I can’t imagine the complexity level of the code involved for something as big as a game like Halo. So I technically don’t have much room to critique, and I don’t think it’s solely the software dev team’s fault with some of the issues we’ve experienced with Halo in the past. I think there are some organizational problems at 343.

I took some 3D modeling courses at a vocational school and got a mechanical/architectural drafting certificate my Sr. year of High school. I was planning on continuing my studies in college to eventually become a level designer in video games but ultimately decided against it.

My only knowledge in coding comes from what I learned using Game Maker throughout my childhood and teenage years in the 90s/2000s, and messing around in project spark when it came out. So I basically know enough to realize that coding can be a nightmare where one small thing can break nearly anything and I’d never want to do it professionally. That’s why I always think it’s kind of a sick joke when people try to tell older workers in dying industries to “learn to code” because it’s not exactly something you can casually learn in a couple of months and be proficient at.

Here’s the game I was working on using Project Spark right before it got shut down https://youtu.be/Qs8YmozSGfw . A major hangup I had on this was getting the gravity suit functional, every time I got it to work it would cause some weird problem with the physics. I sadly don’t have any footage from my old high school projects, they were pretty simple though and included a recreation of Pacman, Pong, and my attempt at a Sonic game, though I couldn’t get slopes working for that so that pretty much killed it for me.

> 2533274798525923;11:
> > 2533274902478287;1:
> > Not trying to be snarky – trying to get a legitimate gauge of how many people have ever worked for a software company, either in or close to product/engineering. (I work in tech)
>
> I went to school for game design (3D modeling and animation)
>
> Here’s a link for someone who works and teaches the stuff with a very detailed breakdown about why in fact Infinite does not look good, for those interested in a more professional analysis: Let's Talk About Those Graphics... | An Environment Artist's Layman's Explanation | Halo: Infinite - YouTube

I never said I wasn’t disappointed by the graphics. I’ll check the vid though. My point is I do see alot of people making statements like they have expertise in game design and development. I lowered the bar to see how many WPers have even tangentially related tech/software experience.

> 2533274917301945;4:
> I work closely with a small software team (not videogame related) at work, but not directly myself. I have also created games for school programming projects (group) in college and made hobby-level (solo) games in my spare time.
>
> I have a good understanding of game mechanics on a software level and a reasonable understanding of software production/support, but I wouldn’t say i have a good idea of what happens within AAA game/software companies like 343i.

I love how humble D1LLYBEAN was, and this humbled myself as well. I do want to encourage everyone to be humble about it if you haven’t been in that situation – and if you have, I value your professional opinion on Halo Infinite’s development.

> 2533274902478287;1:
> Not trying to be snarky – trying to get a legitimate gauge of how many people have ever worked for a software company, either in or close to product/engineering. (I work in tech)

I am a product manager for a large SaaS company. I have worked on products at all stages of the product lifecycle (pre-revenue, early startup, mature) directly with dedicated dev teams.

Even still, I would never make an assumption of how “easy” or “hard” a change would be.

The number of armchair developers (and the level of ignorance to the realities of software development) is astounding.

I’m Software Developer in a multinational company. I can imagine how the devs feel right now at 343. People are hating a gameplay demo that’s far away from Release. Talking about switching the engine without knowing one programming Language, delaying the game cuz of polishing,…

The people at 343 have put so much work into the game and the community starts a -Yoink!- about everything…

Low key damage control thread.

> 2535407109813100;17:
> Low key damage control thread.

Yep, I’m secretly Phil Spencer.

AMA!

12+ years, which includes AAA and aerospace (flight sims). I’m not sure what the point of this thread is? Maybe its to shed some needed light on how game development works which is much different than traditional software development or simulation. When building a game there are many moving parts which evolve and change overtime. Somethings change rapidly, some slowly, some become pillars which “should not” change (I would guess a lot of things changed in the last 5 years, engine, core machines, story, etc) … or else the team has no framework to focus their creativity.

Do I expect changes by launch? Yes… here are my expectations based on typically studio bandwidth and interdependence.

  • Game play: No, they have likely hashed this out and changing core base metrics this late would drastically disrupt level flow and layouts to campaign and MP - Character models: No, as in changing or updating geometry. Yes, small fixes such as color pallets and other things that can be batched out with smart materials that increase, decrease, or remove grunge and ware on characters and armor. Maybe, hair and update to shaders ( for performance) - Animations: Yes, these are constantly being refined - VFX: Yes, The final pass on effects is something that gets refined near the end and is part of optimization - Textures: No, Maybe color pallets again - Lighting: Yes/No the main issue with the demo is it takes place in shadow. The lighting rig is dynamic directional light (physical sun), but the bounce lighting is currently fake. RTX will be added… to what extent we do not know… Now many bounces, real time GI, self OA… etc. - Code base: Yes, optimization - Networking: IDK, I hope it works - Sound: Yes, implementation and mixing - Marketing: No comment:)Let’s sit back, relax. and make some Craig memes.

I write code to maintain an on-prem Oracle DB Server for a pretty big company. Mostly stuff like adding new columns to tables based off whatever business rules were given. And it’s for an internal web-app no one outside the company sees, so it’s not the most exciting stuff to explain to outside people.

I don’t write in C, and I don’t work in gaming. But I do work in software development.