Homing fire is bad for Halo

Halo’s gameplay has always been designed for, and rewarded, constant movement. It just feels better to be on the move, it makes the game feel faster even when it isn’t necessarily, and there’s that added sense of satisfaction when you and an elite are trying to outmaneuver each other in a dance of death, rather than flitting to point A, expending a lot of rounds, flitting to point B and doing the same. Enemy projectiles have always moved a little slower, and had a wide spread, to allow the player to move around them (not all of them, of course, there was still a challenge). So rather than running between two points of cover, the player could instead move more freely. It was less restrictive. However, in Halo 5, enemy projectiles move much faster, and at a greater range. That blast from a plasma rifle that you could dance around if you were quick enough became a laser torrent of storm rifle fire that forces you behind cover. The faster projectiles, while I suppose they make sense for a game with such high movement as Halo 5’s, offer an all-or-nothing approach to the problem. You can do whatever you want in the pauses when an enemy just doesn’t move or shoot, but once that Elite jumps to his left and unleashes hell from his alien spud gun, you’re out of luck unless you set up camp behind a wall.

And then the main issue. Homing fire. If fast-moving projectiles were a slap in the face to Halo’s combat, homing fire was a bullet between the eyes. The player is actively punished for attempting to close the gap between enemies. If I see a group of Crawlers at medium range, I have to stay at medium range, because their fast-moving homing-fire projectiles from Boltshots and Suppressors will drop me regardless of how well I can move. I am being told to stay behind cover, pock my head out and dome one or two before ducking again. That isn’t very Halo. Halo is about fighting on the move. Now, I wouldn’t mind if this was an issue with the two Promethean weapons as such, but when we have Boltshots and Suppressors, as well as Needlers, Hunters cannons, Incineration Cannons and more, then it becomes exceedingly stale.

TL:DR: I think it’s more fun to move around slower projectiles rather than being permenantely pinned by hyperspeed homing bullets.

But fast movement punishes homing weapons pretty easily if you use thrusters and get in close.

> 2535428854412134;2:
> But fast movement punishes homing weapons pretty easily if you use thrusters and get in close.

You can thrust once every 4-5 seconds, plenty of time for enemies to hit you between thrusts. And multiple targets firing homing shots negate the pros of getting in close. AI have the advantage of numbers, too.

> 2533274849069111;1:
> Halo’s gameplay has always been designed for, and rewarded, constant movement. It just feels better to be on the move, it makes the game feel faster even when it isn’t necessarily, and there’s that added sense of satisfaction when you and an elite are trying to outmaneuver each other in a dance of death, rather than flitting to point A, expending a lot of rounds, flitting to point B and doing the same. Enemy projectiles have always moved a little slower, and had a wide spread, to allow the player to move around them (not all of them, of course, there was still a challenge). So rather than running between two points of cover, the player could instead move more freely. It was less restrictive. However, in Halo 5, enemy projectiles move much faster, and at a greater range. That blast from a plasma rifle that you could dance around if you were quick enough became a laser torrent of storm rifle fire that forces you behind cover. The faster projectiles, while I suppose they make sense for a game with such high movement as Halo 5’s, offer an all-or-nothing approach to the problem. You can do whatever you want in the pauses when an enemy just doesn’t move or shoot, but once that Elite jumps to his left and unleashes hell from his alien spud gun, you’re out of luck unless you set up camp behind a wall.
>
> And then the main issue. Homing fire. If fast-moving projectiles were a slap in the face to Halo’s combat, homing fire was a bullet between the eyes. The player is actively punished for attempting to close the gap between enemies. If I see a group of Crawlers at medium range, I have to stay at medium range, because their fast-moving homing-fire projectiles from Boltshots and Suppressors will drop me regardless of how well I can move. I am being told to stay behind cover, pock my head out and dome one or two before ducking again. That isn’t very Halo. Halo is about fighting on the move. Now, I wouldn’t mind if this was an issue with the two Promethean weapons as such, but when we have Boltshots and Suppressors, as well as Needlers, Hunters cannons, Incineration Cannons and more, then it becomes exceedingly stale.
>
> TL:DR: I think it’s more fun to move around slower projectiles rather than being permenantely pinned by hyperspeed homing bullets.

Halo weapons have always had homing weapons (needeler) also there was always bullet magnetism too

Are you complaining about AI killing you in campaign and FF with the Promethean weapons?

Honestly I don’t see much of a difference in how many times I’ve died or in the strategy I employ. I mean I assume you’re playing on Legendary, and in every Halo game you need to take cover, there is no dancing with elites, you will die.

The only homing projectiles that are a real problem are the hunter cannons.

Nah… What few weapons “home in” on you isn’t to many and their projectiles aren’t that fast.

These “Homing Weapons” are no different than the painful Halo 2 legendary jackal snipers. Oh wait no, they are easy compared to that. We all remember those guys. Aimbot and everything. Here’s what I think, you either have homing weapons with projectiles at the current speed, or you have aimbot enemies that one-shot you instantly

I agree with you. It’s not so much that it makes the game harder but moreso that it makes it hide behind cover pop out and hide again. It dulls the gameplay and makes you play it likes cod campaign almost. Even though they give the extra movement you can only use it every 4-5 sec and I feel like it actually limits your movement because you’re usually just standing behind cover and popping it for a few quick bursts.

If you are having trouble you shuld pick them off from a distance. I did this a lot in my Legendary Campaign playthrough (I completed it on another account before you say that I didn’t). It’s not that hard, the enemies don’t rush you (unless you have terrible luck where you get every issue under the sun…)

Only if Boltshots and Suppressors never had needler-like homing capabilities… wonder how that would turn out, especially for Legendary Co-Op.

Its simply another part of the game and actually is a welcomed challenge. It is as well a logical response to having a character built like a tank running at enemies, there would be no skill in simply charging blindly and dodging bullets like a matrix movie. This feature prevents inexperienced and/or unskilled players from simply beating a player to death while they do nothing but hide and wait without a telling thing like a glowing sword or something to boost damage. It simply makes you conditioned to not just run at enemies all game long, you just need to learn when to time your moves and if running in is a lucrative move or if its better to fallback into a firefight position.

Guys, while I appreciate the implications that I’m complaining about homing fire killing me, I implore you to read the OP again. I never mentioned that. I said it changes the gameplay from run-and-gun to peekaboo, rewarding you for hiding instead of moving. I’m also aware that the Needler was also a homing weapon, and addressed it in the OP.

> 2533274849069111;12:
> Guys, while I appreciate the implications that I’m complaining about homing fire killing me, I implore you to read the OP again. I never mentioned that. I said it changes the gameplay from run-and-gun to peekaboo, rewarding you for hiding instead of moving. I’m also aware that the Needler was also a homing weapon, and addressed it in the OP.

Halo has never been run-and-gun. If you played Halo on Legendary you would know that you can’t just run around. You have to slowly pick them off or you die. Unless you speedrun the game. Then it doesn’t matter

> 2533274888753908;13:
> > 2533274849069111;12:
> > Guys, while I appreciate the implications that I’m complaining about homing fire killing me, I implore you to read the OP again. I never mentioned that. I said it changes the gameplay from run-and-gun to peekaboo, rewarding you for hiding instead of moving. I’m also aware that the Needler was also a homing weapon, and addressed it in the OP.
>
> Halo has never been run-and-gun. If you played Halo on Legendary you would know that you can’t just run around. You have to slowly pick them off or you die. Unless you speedrun the game. Then it doesn’t matter

Legendary isn’t a good example of how Halo is played at all, Heroic is. And in Heroic you tend to move around a lot more. Besides, you can still pick enemies off on the move…