Halo Infinite's Competitive Scene Needs To Improve

Hi everyone. I’ve been playing Halo and following the competitive scene closely since Halo 2. I’ve been to 9 events as a spectator and competed in 2. I’ve spent many hours at the events and plenty more hours watching events on Twitch when I couldn’t attend them in person. With that being said, the production level of Halo Tournaments has always been subpar compared to other eSports Leagues. To me, Halo will always be MY game to play. As I’ve grown older with Halo and eSports in general, I’ve become more exposed to other leagues and games that have a much better production level, which has made watching Halo tournaments slightly less enjoyable for me. When I say “production”, I don’t mean flashy lights and big banners with players faces on them.

The main two areas I want to give feedback on are casting and downtime.

Casting
The main point of watching a tournament live is to listen to the casters interact with each other and give us good insight on the players and the match that’s currently being played. I don’t feel the type of connection I have with casters from other games with Halo. The casting feels too fast and sometimes hard to follow. Sometimes it feels like they are running out of breath because they make an attempt to fit in as much info in 30 seconds as they can get out. Don’t get me wrong, I love when casters get excited and I love hearing their reaction to an amazing play, but the excitement level from the Halo casters feels like it’s almost always maxed out just from the start of the first match. This is not some personal dig at any specific caster, it just feels like the casting style hasn’t evolved any since the early days of competitive Halo.

Downtime
Downtime in a tournament gets very boring, very quickly. Unfortunately, it happens quite a bit in Halo. Showing interesting stats (not just stats from the previous match), having better individual or team insight, showing highlights from the previous match, and having more talking points for the casters is keeps viewers entertained. There’s no reason or excuse to not have anything to discuss or show during downtime.

Summary
With that being said, I hope that 343i is developing Infinite with these types of things in mind. The overall production level of the events needs to improve. Individual casters are not the problem, but the casting style needs to change. Downtime needs to be more interesting other than showing an overkill from someone who submitted a clip.

Please keep in mind, these are my opinions and you do not have to like them. I’m just sharing my thoughts with the community. I want Halo Infinite to succeed and help grow the Halo community.

> 2533274800066051;1:
> Hi everyone. I’ve been playing Halo and following the competitive scene closely since Halo 2. I’ve been to 9 events as a spectator and competed in 2. I’ve spent many hours at the events and plenty more hours watching events on Twitch when I couldn’t attend them in person. With that being said, the production level of Halo Tournaments has always been subpar compared to other eSports Leagues. To me, Halo will always be MY game to play. As I’ve grown older with Halo and eSports in general, I’ve become more exposed to other leagues and games that have a much better production level, which has made watching Halo tournaments slightly less enjoyable for me. When I say “production”, I don’t mean flashy lights and big banners with players faces on them.
>
> The main two areas I want to give feedback on are casting and downtime.
>
> CastingThe main point of watching a tournament live is to listen to the casters interact with each other and give us good insight on the players and the match that’s currently being played. I don’t feel the type of connection I have with casters from other games with Halo. The casting feels too fast and sometimes hard to follow. Sometimes it feels like they are running out of breath because they make an attempt to fit in as much info in 30 seconds as they can get out. Don’t get me wrong, I love when casters get excited and I love hearing their reaction to an amazing play, but the excitement level from the Halo casters feels like it’s almost always maxed out just from the start of the first match. This is not some personal dig at any specific caster, it just feels like the casting style hasn’t evolved any since the early days of competitive Halo.
>
> DowntimeDowntime in a tournament gets very boring, very quickly. Unfortunately, it happens quite a bit in Halo. Showing interesting stats (not just stats from the previous match), having better individual or team insight, showing highlights from the previous match, and having more talking points for the casters is keeps viewers entertained. There’s no reason or excuse to not have anything to discuss or show during downtime.
>
> SummaryWith that being said, I hope that 343i is developing Infinite with these types of things in mind. The overall production level of the events needs to improve. Individual casters are not the problem, but the casting style needs to change. Downtime needs to be more interesting other than showing an overkill from someone who submitted a clip.
>
> Please keep in mind, these are my opinions and you do not have to like them. I’m just sharing my thoughts with the community. I want Halo Infinite to succeed and help grow the Halo community.

Honestly solid arguments. I’m not big into eSports but I do watch HCS and I have to agree entirely.

Part of the solution I think is to use the events as more of a community thing. Plenty of folk would watch just for that and more may stick around for the matches

These are some great points you make. I do agree that the casters are probably one of the most important parts of any esports event because that is the thing that viewers will interact and hear the most during a tournament. Having casters that are knowledgeable and passionate about the game they are casting will go a long way to making an event much more enjoyable. I also think that it will come down to what kind of game Halo Infinite turns out to be. One of the issues I have with Overwatch League, for example, is that too often the game can look like a giant cluster for about 15-20 seconds when there is a team fight and then suddenly one team is dead. For players that understand the game of Overwatch and what every hero does, it’s very exciting and you don’t really have an issue with watching the game. But for a casual viewer or someone who doesn’t play Overwatch, the game just looks like a bunch of gunshots and flashing lights until everyone is dead. I don’t think Halo will run into this issue because inherently it is a more streamlined game, but there are still nuances and strategies to the game. Halo is also a slower game than many other shooters out today, which does lead to more downtime during games than maybe other fps games would have. I think if casters do a great job of delving into not just what is happening during a game, but why it is happening and the strategy and thought process of players as they are playing, then it would be a great draw not just for the esports scene, but for the game itself.

> 2533274866022405;3:
> These are some great points you make. I do agree that the casters are probably one of the most important parts of any esports event because that is the thing that viewers will interact and hear the most during a tournament. Having casters that are knowledgeable and passionate about the game they are casting will go a long way to making an event much more enjoyable. I also think that it will come down to what kind of game Halo Infinite turns out to be. One of the issues I have with Overwatch League, for example, is that too often the game can look like a giant cluster for about 15-20 seconds when there is a team fight and then suddenly one team is dead. For players that understand the game of Overwatch and what every hero does, it’s very exciting and you don’t really have an issue with watching the game. But for a casual viewer or someone who doesn’t play Overwatch, the game just looks like a bunch of gunshots and flashing lights until everyone is dead. I don’t think Halo will run into this issue because inherently it is a more streamlined game, but there are still nuances and strategies to the game. Halo is also a slower game than many other shooters out today, which does lead to more downtime during games than maybe other fps games would have. I think if casters do a great job of delving into not just what is happening during a game, but why it is happening and the strategy and thought process of players as they are playing, then it would be a great draw not just for the esports scene, but for the game itself.

Exactly. They shouldn’t just be telling us what’s happening like they’re writing the closed captions for the match. Dive into what’s happening. Talk about the play making and decision skills.

All we need is Chris Puckett.

> 2533274862038299;5:
> All we need is Chris Puckett.

There’s so much truth in these 6 words.