H4 Forge: Polygons for palette objects

For Halo 4 forge…

How many people would prefer to have just the simply polygon (triangle) object as the palette object to forge with, if the forge came with the ability to size, color, texture, and combine the polygons into any object you wanted to make, and you could save it in your personal or community library for reuse over and over again?

I would prefer it over anything, because with patience I can make anything. i could make high performance (objects that do not induce low frame rates) large objects to look like anything. it may be more work, but it is far less frustrating.

As an alternate map editor, sure. That’d be a great idea.

But this is basically modeling a map as a 3D mesh, from the ground up. Way too difficult for most Halo players – myself included – and replacing Forge with it would prevent a lot of people from expressing their creativity and keeping the game alive.

It could exist side-by-side with Forge – which would open a lot of interesting possibilities, especially if the two systems can be applied to the same map…

Just FYI, I was not referring to editing the entire map, but just the objects you want to add to the map.

And I would argue that it would not be an alternate forge tool, but that it could have a palette with predefined objects, and then at the bottom the polygon from which you can create your own library of objects. that way a forger can use the predefined objects and then when there isn’t anything that matches that one rounded corner that they need to create, they have the ability to make a new object.

I know there are a lot of things that people would like to see in the next forge, but if there was only one thing that got added to forge I would love for it to be just one more object in the palette - the polygon - and all the necessary properties and functionality to create new objects from it.

No competent studio would ever waste manpower, time and money on advanced, hard to use features almost no one would ever use.

Forge exists because it is EXTREMELY simple to use - yesterday I had a friend who never played Halo come over and he immediately learned how to use the Forge.

And you can’t forget you are using an Xbox controller - not a mouse and a keyboard.

> No competent studio would ever waste manpower, time and money on advanced, hard to use features almost no one would ever use

http://www.forgehub.com/

> > No competent studio would ever waste manpower, time and money on advanced, hard to use features almost no one would ever use
>
> http://www.forgehub.com/

Forge is not hard to use, and far more people use it than you think. Its implementation is also (comparatively) very simple.

Try again.

> > > No competent studio would ever waste manpower, time and money on advanced, hard to use features almost no one would ever use
> >
> > http://www.forgehub.com/
>
> Forge is not hard to use, and far more people use it than you think. Its implementation is also (comparatively) very simple.
>
> Try again.

He was saying that a polygon object and the necessary additional support and properties to form aggregates would be used so little and so difficult to use that no studio would develop the feature set. I don’t know that I agree, but it is a decent argument. I personally think that if 343i introduced a basic functionality, even if clunky, plenty of people would use it to form new objects. I believe there is a craving within the community, an overwhelming craving to go beyond anything that has been done to date. I believe a lot of people are technical and patient enough to work through what ever hoops they are handed, whatever prehistoric tools they are given.

The reason I believe this is two fold. Firstly, H3 forge was far more cumbersome than what I am describing for any forger to endure, and yet a number of good maps came out of it. Enduring patience was essential. Second, forge 2.0 has generated a tremendous number of maps, because it is so easy to use. But they all have the problem of duplicating each other. There are so many boundaries that keep creativity bound up that to cut through it would cause, I believe, an explosion, though perhaps slow and small, of unprecedented concepts in architecture.

And it would not be such a bad thing to raise the pain bar on forging great maps again. Plenty of noobs would quit forging, while the real pros do great and amazing art work.

In retrospect, you could argue that his argument falls on its face in light of H3 forge. But I said all I need to say on this point. I leave it to you all to discuss further before I say more…