Dancing: dodging or button mashing?

When you jiggle strafe, jackrabbit jump, and zip around in circles, do you actually make conscious decisions on where and when to move in relation to your opponents moves, purposely dodging his/her moves? Or is it all random directions and timing, basically button mashing?

Conscious decisions, which are continuously adjusted depending on my opponents ability to read my strafe. Though to be fair, my strafe isn’t very good. I can normally just bank on my aim being able to make up for it.

> When you jiggle strafe, jackrabbit jump, and zip around in circles, do you actually make conscious decisions on where and when to move in relation to your opponents moves, purposely dodging his/her moves? Or is it all random directions and timing, basically button mashing?

JACKRABBIT JUMP?!?!?!?!?

The correct term is the “Gandhi Hop”, as the technique was made famous by MLG pro player Gandhi back in Halo 2. Also Gandhi hopping isn’t that effective in Reach. Due to the bloom you’re much better off crouching for your final shot rather than trying to Gandhi hop, at least from what I’ve seen (Except in SWAT where Gandhi Hopping is still highly effective)

Also my strafe has nothing to do with how my opponent strafes. My movement is more based off their weapon. If they have a DMR I strafe, if they have an AR I back peddle. You just have to realize how each weapon is used effectively, and enter a movement pattern which reduces its effectiveness.

If you try to look at your opponent’s strafe, then strafe in relation to that…you’ll wind up losing. Action is quicker than reaction. Don’t react to their strafe, just do your own.

> > When you jiggle strafe, jackrabbit jump, and zip around in circles, do you actually make conscious decisions on where and when to move in relation to your opponents moves, purposely dodging his/her moves? Or is it all random directions and timing, basically button mashing?
>
> JACKRABBIT JUMP?!?!?!?!?
>
> The correct term is the “Gandhi Hop”, as the technique was made famous by MLG pro player Gandhi back in Halo 2. Also Gandhi hopping isn’t that effective in Reach. Due to the bloom you’re much better off crouching for your final shot rather than trying to Gandhi hop, at least from what I’ve seen (Except in SWAT where Gandhi Hopping is still highly effective)
>
> Also my strafe has nothing to do with how my opponent strafes. My movement is more based off their weapon. If they have a DMR I strafe, if they have an AR I back peddle. You just have to realize how each weapon is used effectively, and enter a movement pattern which reduces its effectiveness.
>
> If you try to look at your opponent’s strafe, then strafe in relation to that…you’ll wind up losing. Action is quicker than reaction. Don’t react to their strafe, just do your own.

Ok, you apparently don’t “dance” like I’m referring to, you have your own thing, and that’s good. Incidentally, I don’t just react. I read and anticipate my opponents movements.

> Ok, you apparently don’t “dance” like I’m referring to, you have your own thing, and that’s good. Incidentally, I don’t just react. I read and anticipate my opponents movements.

Sorry I should probably clarify my position on this. There is nothing wrong with anticipating your opponent’s movements, but keep in mind it can be used against you as well.

In Halo 3 the BR was a 4-shot kill and a popular pattern at the time was left,right,left,jump…jumping on the fourth shot in an effort to make your opponent miss. After a while people caught onto this and started anticipating the jump.

You could try to anticipate your opponent’s strafe, left,right,left,right. Me personally since few people can out DMR me, if I see that you do in fact out DMR me I take note of your name. Then next encounter instead of the traditional left,right,left,right I’ll know that you’re assuming it so I’ll switch up with say left,right,left,left…so when you anticipate me moving right your shot misses and it gives me an advantage on you.

Granted against most casual players anticipating will work, just keep in mind it could be used against you. Also anticipating somebody’s movements still shouldn’t affect your strafe.

Left Thumb-Strafing, doesn’t care what opponent is doing, just what effective range his weapon has
Right Thumb-Keeping track of opponent, anticipating, etc

Also would you mind sending me an invite next time you’re on and you can show me the “Dance” you’re referring to? GT: BWO Arbiter

I’ve gone beyond simple pattern recognition, I go into deeper observation and prediction of human behavior than that. I used to 1v1 with a friend who used high level strategy and was very unpredictable. I really had to work to learn how to follow and predict his movement, as well as learn high level strategy. You have to realize, I’m not trying to make it as easy as possible on myself. I enjoy a challenge, I try Togo head to head with people and see if I can outperform them.

My strafe movements are situation-dependent. Some factors which dictate how or when I strafe are:

  • my surroundings… is there cover?
  • my shields
  • my weapon
  • my opponent’s weapon
  • my opponent’s shields
  • line of sight for teammates/opponents

If you’re only talking about an open field DMR battle at close - mid range with no other factors, then I like to mix a slower strafe with a quick one. If I’m one shot, I like to crouch or jump. I wish I had a little more dexterity and could perfect a quick crouch strafe like Formal and some other pros.

Thanks for the responses guys. It’s interesting though, the guys I’m really talking about haven’t responded.

you mean the right stick figure 8 dance? as far as I’ve seen with that style its about 50/50 on wether or not they are acting out of a set pattern or a responsive strategy, I’ve used it before, it can be effective, but i find that the player who rely on it to much end up getting their heads blown off when they reverse the 8 and they’re almost still for a moment. The approach i find that overcomes the figure 8 dance is a charge/strafe forcing them to reverse their 8 or flee.

> you mean the right stick figure 8 dance? as far as I’ve seen with that style its about 50/50 on wether or not they are acting out of a set pattern or a responsive strategy, I’ve used it before, it can be effective, but i find that the player who rely on it to much end up getting their heads blown off when they reverse the 8 and they’re almost still for a moment. The approach i find that overcomes the figure 8 dance is a charge/strafe forcing them to reverse their 8 or flee.

That must be it. I thought they were just strafing around me, thanks for the tip.

A few times I tried just stopping still in the middle of the fight when I was behind him for a moment, then start strafing around to keep out of his line of sight. He would suddenly stop after a moment and slowly try to figure out where I disappeared to. Then I’d close in on him while staying behind him.