Come on...

Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.

> 2533274807468284;1:
> Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.

Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?

You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.

> 2533274833081329;2:
> > 2533274807468284;1:
> > Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.
>
> Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?
>
> You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.

Your name is spelled incorrectly…

This wouldn’t be a problem if the servers functioned properly. The lag I deal with sometimes is insane, and I run Ethernet on 80down 10up.

The server should have a way to register quits and connection issues. unfortunately, this issue will never be fixed as its been since launch. i truly believe that a player should not be penalized by dropping CSR or temporary ban by server problems. in addition, when we do get drop by server issues we get a message of “your console lost connection to the server”. i dont see why 343 doesnt use this message in favor for not loosing CSR and avoid a ban. I have a speed of 60 mbs and plugged via cat 6 ethernet connection and i still get dropped.

75 mbps and ethernet to my router. Very frustrating

I only have a 6Mb down, 1Mb up connection and the servers work flawlessly for me, very rarely see any lag and no disconnects.

The system can already differentiate between a menu quit and a disconnect, the issue is that when a disconnect occurs there is no 100% way to figure out why that happened. Disconnects could be you being dropped from the server, it could be your internet cutting out, power cut, unplugging your ethernet cable, turning off your Xbox. The server doesn’t know why you are no longer in the game, it just knows that it’s no longer receiving pings from your console. It’s for that reason that disconnects can penalize you, otherwise everyone could just unplug / dashboard / etc. to avoid a loss and have no repercussions.

As a last note: fast connections do not always mean stable connections

thats a very good point i never thought about.

> 2533274833081329;2:
> > 2533274807468284;1:
> > Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.
>
> Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?
>
> You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.

Easy. Have the Xbox log your button presses. If you turn it off or dashboard, the Xbox will tell the game next time you play it, and you get a ban.

> 2533274792641480;10:
> > 2533274833081329;2:
> > > 2533274807468284;1:
> > > Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.
> >
> > Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?
> >
> > You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.
>
> Easy. Have the Xbox log your button presses. If you turn it off or dashboard, the Xbox will tell the game next time you play it, and you get a ban.

  • Ethernet Cable being removed - Router being reset - Modem being reset - Xbox is hard reset - Xbox plays a different gameNone of those involve the controller in any way, and all lead to a disconnect.

Not even considering that now the Xbox needs a system to log all your button presses to search for a specific pattern, Halo now needs a system to receive that message and act accordingly.

That, and dashboard doesn’t directly lead to a disconnect like it does for the Xbox 360.

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> > > 2533274833081329;2:
> > > > 2533274807468284;1:
> > > > Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.
> > >
> > > Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?
> > >
> > > You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.
> >
> > Easy. Have the Xbox log your button presses. If you turn it off or dashboard, the Xbox will tell the game next time you play it, and you get a ban.
>
> - Ethernet Cable being removed - Router being reset - Modem being reset - Xbox is hard reset - Xbox plays a different gameNone of those involve the controller in any way, and all lead to a disconnect.
>
> Not even considering that now the Xbox needs a system to log all your button presses to search for a specific pattern, Halo now needs a system to receive that message and act accordingly.
>
> That, and dashboard doesn’t directly lead to a disconnect like it does for the Xbox 360.

All of the above require you to stop playing the game and put down the controller. It could be logged that you stopped playing, and suddenly disconnected. Your score at the time could be taken into account as people usually quit when they’re losing. Over time they could build up a profile and see that you quit regularly and ban you.

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> > > 2533274792641480;10:
> > > > 2533274833081329;2:
> > > > > 2533274807468284;1:
> > > > > Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.
> > > >
> > > > Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?
> > > >
> > > > You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.
> > >
> > > Easy. Have the Xbox log your button presses. If you turn it off or dashboard, the Xbox will tell the game next time you play it, and you get a ban.
> >
> > - Ethernet Cable being removed - Router being reset - Modem being reset - Xbox is hard reset - Xbox plays a different gameNone of those involve the controller in any way, and all lead to a disconnect.
> >
> > Not even considering that now the Xbox needs a system to log all your button presses to search for a specific pattern, Halo now needs a system to receive that message and act accordingly.
> >
> > That, and dashboard doesn’t directly lead to a disconnect like it does for the Xbox 360.
>
> All of the above require you to stop playing the game and put down the controller. It could be logged that you stopped playing, and suddenly disconnected. Your score at the time could be taken into account as people usually quit when they’re losing. Over time they could build up a profile and see that you quit regularly and ban you.

None of them require any activity on the controller’s part, or even putting down the controller to be honest.

Now, how do you implement a system like that? While there is an idle state on wireless controllers, the controller can’t always tell when it’s not being put down. The controller doesn’t have to be in motion to be active, and buttons don’t have to constantly be pressed to be active. It takes under 10 seconds to do any of the above, and the controller isn’t even a factor in this. You have to create a system that tracks every second a button or trigger on the controller is not pressed, when the user could just be idle for any other reason, or waiting in a loading screen.

And all I have to do to sidestep your system is to hold a trigger while pulling my Ethernet cord. That entire system ruined with just an iota more effort on my part.

Now you’re creating a whole system that aim to profile you and ban you accordingly on this one game. That is a massive amount of time and effort to create a small and inefficient workaround from the current banhammer.

> 2533274802237072;7:
> I only have a 6Mb down, 1Mb up connection and the servers work flawlessly for me, very rarely see any lag and no disconnects.

you can thank lag compensation.

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> > > > 2533274792641480;10:
> > > > > 2533274833081329;2:
> > > > > > 2533274807468284;1:
> > > > > > Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.
> > > > >
> > > > > Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?
> > > > > You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.
> > > >
> > > > Easy. Have the Xbox log your button presses. If you turn it off or dashboard, the Xbox will tell the game next time you play it, and you get a ban.
> > >
> > > - Ethernet Cable being removed - Router being reset - Modem being reset - Xbox is hard reset - Xbox plays a different gameNone of those involve the controller in any way, and all lead to a disconnect.
> > > Not even considering that now the Xbox needs a system to log all your button presses to search for a specific pattern, Halo now needs a system to receive that message and act accordingly.
> > > That, and dashboard doesn’t directly lead to a disconnect like it does for the Xbox 360.
> >
> > All of the above require you to stop playing the game and put down the controller. It could be logged that you stopped playing, and suddenly disconnected. Your score at the time could be taken into account as people usually quit when they’re losing. Over time they could build up a profile and see that you quit regularly and ban you.
>
> None of them require any activity on the controller’s part, or even putting down the controller to be honest.
> Now, how do you implement a system like that? While there is an idle state on wireless controllers, the controller can’t always tell when it’s not being put down. The controller doesn’t have to be in motion to be active, and buttons don’t have to constantly be pressed to be active. It takes under 10 seconds to do any of the above, and the controller isn’t even a factor in this. You have to create a system that tracks every second a button or trigger on the controller is not pressed, when the user could just be idle for any other reason, or waiting in a loading screen.
> And all I have to do to sidestep your system is to hold a trigger while pulling my Ethernet cord. That entire system ruined with just an iota more effort on my part.
> Now you’re creating a whole system that aim to profile you and ban you accordingly on this one game. That is a massive amount of time and effort to create a small and inefficient workaround from the current banhammer.

Look, I’m not a programmer, and I’m not going to sit here and hammer out the finer details of exactly how such a system would work. It’s not my job, nor do I care enough.
What I am going to say is that of course it can be done, and I don’t know why you’re trying so hard to shoot it down. It’s pathetic really, you seem to be one of these people that loves to argue about everything. Exactly the type of person that I have no time for. Try to get the bigger picture for a minute and stop getting hung up on the details, stop trying to find faults and instead come up with some ideas of your own. Or as the saying goes you can’t see the forest for all the trees.

For example you’re saying about sidestepping it, but there are several ways to track user interaction. Reset a router and the IP address might change. Dashboard the game or press the power button and it could be logged. Go 0 and 10 in a game and suddenly disconnect a few times, it flags you. Build up a profile on someone combining lots of data, and identify them as a quitter and band them, it’s really that simple. And don’t give out any details of what you track, so that people don’t know to hold the damn trigger when they reset.

I have given a rough outline of an idea and you’re already trying to fault it at every turn. Yet 343 already have a ban system that looks for patterns, so this would just be an expansion of that, using user input and other data. Anyway, like I said you’re clearly not a concept type of person so I don’t think I’ll bother to reply any further unless you say something notable. I don’t like to converse with negative people that offer nothing and just shoot down ideas, I prefer an exchange of ideas that build off one another.

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> > > > > > 2533274833081329;2:
> > > > > > > 2533274807468284;1:
> > > > > > > Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.
> > > > >
> > > > > Easy. Have the Xbox log your button presses. If you turn it off or dashboard, the Xbox will tell the game next time you play it, and you get a ban.
> > > >
> > > > - Ethernet Cable being removed - Router being reset - Modem being reset - Xbox is hard reset - Xbox plays a different gameNone of those involve the controller in any way, and all lead to a disconnect.
> > > >
> > > > Not even considering that now the Xbox needs a system to log all your button presses to search for a specific pattern, Halo now needs a system to receive that message and act accordingly.
> > > >
> > > > That, and dashboard doesn’t directly lead to a disconnect like it does for the Xbox 360.
> > >
> > > All of the above require you to stop playing the game and put down the controller. It could be logged that you stopped playing, and suddenly disconnected. Your score at the time could be taken into account as people usually quit when they’re losing. Over time they could build up a profile and see that you quit regularly and ban you.
> >
> > None of them require any activity on the controller’s part, or even putting down the controller to be honest.
> >
> > Now, how do you implement a system like that? While there is an idle state on wireless controllers, the controller can’t always tell when it’s not being put down. The controller doesn’t have to be in motion to be active, and buttons don’t have to constantly be pressed to be active. It takes under 10 seconds to do any of the above, and the controller isn’t even a factor in this. You have to create a system that tracks every second a button or trigger on the controller is not pressed, when the user could just be idle for any other reason, or waiting in a loading screen.
> >
> > And all I have to do to sidestep your system is to hold a trigger while pulling my Ethernet cord. That entire system ruined with just an iota more effort on my part.
> >
> > Now you’re creating a whole system that aim to profile you and ban you accordingly on this one game. That is a massive amount of time and effort to create a small and inefficient workaround from the current banhammer.
>
> Look, I’m not a programmer, and I’m not going to sit here and hammer out the finer details of exactly how such a system would work. It’s not my job, nor do I care enough.
>
> What I am going to say is that of course it can be done, and I don’t know why you’re trying so hard to shoot it down. It’s pathetic really, you seem to be one of these people that loves to argue about everything. Exactly the type of person that I have no time for. Try to get the bigger picture for a minute and stop getting hung up on the details, stop trying to find faults and instead come up with some ideas of your own.

I’m shooting it down because they are very poor ideas, and people will easily get around them. It’s like building a wall to stop people in helicopters.

How do you create a system that determines the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect? Unless the Xbox console is omniscient, it cannot tell the difference between me dropping out of the game from the 3-4 different ways to do so.

And even if it is, all I have to do is reset my router, and I can “drop the game” without any input on the Xbox, simulating a disconnect. Nothing the console can do can stop that.

You wanna know my idea? The banhammer we have now. All disconnects eventually lead to a ban because they all affect the game the same way.

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> > > > > > > 2533274833081329;2:
> > > > > > > > 2533274807468284;1:
> > > > > > > > Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Easy. Have the Xbox log your button presses. If you turn it off or dashboard, the Xbox will tell the game next time you play it, and you get a ban.
> > > > >
> > > > > - Ethernet Cable being removed - Router being reset - Modem being reset - Xbox is hard reset - Xbox plays a different gameNone of those involve the controller in any way, and all lead to a disconnect.
> > > > >
> > > > > Not even considering that now the Xbox needs a system to log all your button presses to search for a specific pattern, Halo now needs a system to receive that message and act accordingly.
> > > > >
> > > > > That, and dashboard doesn’t directly lead to a disconnect like it does for the Xbox 360.
> > > >
> > > > All of the above require you to stop playing the game and put down the controller. It could be logged that you stopped playing, and suddenly disconnected. Your score at the time could be taken into account as people usually quit when they’re losing. Over time they could build up a profile and see that you quit regularly and ban you.
> > >
> > > None of them require any activity on the controller’s part, or even putting down the controller to be honest.
> > >
> > > Now, how do you implement a system like that? While there is an idle state on wireless controllers, the controller can’t always tell when it’s not being put down. The controller doesn’t have to be in motion to be active, and buttons don’t have to constantly be pressed to be active. It takes under 10 seconds to do any of the above, and the controller isn’t even a factor in this. You have to create a system that tracks every second a button or trigger on the controller is not pressed, when the user could just be idle for any other reason, or waiting in a loading screen.
> > >
> > > And all I have to do to sidestep your system is to hold a trigger while pulling my Ethernet cord. That entire system ruined with just an iota more effort on my part.
> > >
> > > Now you’re creating a whole system that aim to profile you and ban you accordingly on this one game. That is a massive amount of time and effort to create a small and inefficient workaround from the current banhammer.
> >
> > Look, I’m not a programmer, and I’m not going to sit here and hammer out the finer details of exactly how such a system would work. It’s not my job, nor do I care enough.
> >
> > What I am going to say is that of course it can be done, and I don’t know why you’re trying so hard to shoot it down. It’s pathetic really, you seem to be one of these people that loves to argue about everything. Exactly the type of person that I have no time for. Try to get the bigger picture for a minute and stop getting hung up on the details, stop trying to find faults and instead come up with some ideas of your own.
>
> I’m shooting it down because they are very poor ideas, and people will easily get around them. It’s like building a wall to stop people in helicopters.
>
> How do you create a system that determines the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect? Unless the Xbox console is omniscient, it cannot tell the difference between me dropping out of the game from the 3-4 different ways to do so.
>
> And even if it is, all I have to do is reset my router, and I can “drop the game” without any input on the Xbox, simulating a disconnect. Nothing the console can do can stop that.
>
> You wanna know my idea? The banhammer we have now. All disconnects eventually lead to a ban because they all affect the game the same way.

Read my edited reply above. As I expected, nothing notable.

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> > > > > > > > 2533274833081329;2:
> > > > > > > > > 2533274807468284;1:
> > > > > > > > > Is there no way to develop a system that can tell the difference between a disconnect and a voluntary quit. Thanks for the -30 CSR in Onyx Slayer winning with 2 kills left to go.
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > Once you do that, how do you tell the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect?
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > You try to forgive others for disconnecting, I’ll just go “Oops, my Ethernet cable got pulled out!” or “Oops, I accidentally went into Xbox Settings and pressed Go Offline!” and be forgiven.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > Easy. Have the Xbox log your button presses. If you turn it off or dashboard, the Xbox will tell the game next time you play it, and you get a ban.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > - Ethernet Cable being removed - Router being reset - Modem being reset - Xbox is hard reset - Xbox plays a different gameNone of those involve the controller in any way, and all lead to a disconnect.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Not even considering that now the Xbox needs a system to log all your button presses to search for a specific pattern, Halo now needs a system to receive that message and act accordingly.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > That, and dashboard doesn’t directly lead to a disconnect like it does for the Xbox 360.
> > > > >
> > > > > All of the above require you to stop playing the game and put down the controller. It could be logged that you stopped playing, and suddenly disconnected. Your score at the time could be taken into account as people usually quit when they’re losing. Over time they could build up a profile and see that you quit regularly and ban you.
> > > >
> > > > None of them require any activity on the controller’s part, or even putting down the controller to be honest.
> > > >
> > > > Now, how do you implement a system like that? While there is an idle state on wireless controllers, the controller can’t always tell when it’s not being put down. The controller doesn’t have to be in motion to be active, and buttons don’t have to constantly be pressed to be active. It takes under 10 seconds to do any of the above, and the controller isn’t even a factor in this. You have to create a system that tracks every second a button or trigger on the controller is not pressed, when the user could just be idle for any other reason, or waiting in a loading screen.
> > > >
> > > > And all I have to do to sidestep your system is to hold a trigger while pulling my Ethernet cord. That entire system ruined with just an iota more effort on my part.
> > > >
> > > > Now you’re creating a whole system that aim to profile you and ban you accordingly on this one game. That is a massive amount of time and effort to create a small and inefficient workaround from the current banhammer.
> > >
> > > Look, I’m not a programmer, and I’m not going to sit here and hammer out the finer details of exactly how such a system would work. It’s not my job, nor do I care enough.
> > >
> > > What I am going to say is that of course it can be done, and I don’t know why you’re trying so hard to shoot it down. It’s pathetic really, you seem to be one of these people that loves to argue about everything. Exactly the type of person that I have no time for. Try to get the bigger picture for a minute and stop getting hung up on the details, stop trying to find faults and instead come up with some ideas of your own.
> >
> > I’m shooting it down because they are very poor ideas, and people will easily get around them. It’s like building a wall to stop people in helicopters.
> >
> > How do you create a system that determines the difference between an accidental disconnect and a purposeful disconnect? Unless the Xbox console is omniscient, it cannot tell the difference between me dropping out of the game from the 3-4 different ways to do so.
> >
> > And even if it is, all I have to do is reset my router, and I can “drop the game” without any input on the Xbox, simulating a disconnect. Nothing the console can do can stop that.
> >
> > You wanna know my idea? The banhammer we have now. All disconnects eventually lead to a ban because they all affect the game the same way.
>
> Read my edited reply above. As I expected, nothing notable.

The reason I haven’t given any ideas to build off of is because what you’ve given are either no better than the banhammer we have right now, or they are so cost ineffective that it’s not worth it. Going back to what I said before, you’re building a 100ft long wall to stop helicopters, then you want to build it higher. Then you want to put spikes on it, then you want to put people with guns on it. Maybe you’re better off just not building the wall in the first place because the helicopters will just fly higher.

If you’re going to try and create a whole system that logs every button you press, every IP you have (assuming it changes at all between reboots), and handling messages and now game stats to and from games, it would be much easier to just keep the banhammer we have now.

You wanted my idea, there it is. Banhammer tracks all disconnects no matter how it happens, you will eventually be banned. There’s no point trying so hard to discern which disconnect is which, they’re all affecting the game the same way.

> 2533274866151283;14:
> > 2533274802237072;7:
> > I only have a 6Mb down, 1Mb up connection and the servers work flawlessly for me, very rarely see any lag and no disconnects.
>
> you can thank lag compensation.

No I just have my ports open for H5. My speeds are double the minimum required, latency causes lag, not speed.