Becoming A Better Teammate Article

This Article deserves to be seen. I know this article may be old but new players and existing players can find this useful information by this article via Source: http://rectifygaming.com/becoming-a-better-teammate/ or just Read Below

I have always enjoyed multiplayer matchmaking video games. Lately, I have been playing a lot of Halo 5: Guardians with my brother and our friends. We are competitive, and we always try to win the match that we get placed in. Sometimes, I place our team in bad situations, simply because I have not done a great job of supporting my team. Team-based games are all about supporting one another to win, much like sports (basketball, football, soccer). Knowing your role, communicating, and listening are important for a team to succeed.

KNOWING YOUR ROLE

Supporting your team is important for victory, as well as acknowledging your strengths and weaknesses. Compared to your teammates, you will notice that you excel at some aspects of the game, but you fall short at others. Continuing to use Halo as our example, I know that I am the weakest sniper on my team. If we ever battle for the sniper rifle, then I know my role is to support my team in capturing the sniper. If I keep the sniper, then I can improve my overall score, but this is a selfish use of a power weapon. However, I know that passing it off to another member will improve our team score, which will result in our team winning.

Roles vary between teams. Some teams have a dedicated objective runner, an extremely good slayer, or a great power weapon runner. Rotating roles can be effective if each player is similar in skill. If you are able to do this, or even practice to become better, then definitely do your best to do that. When you are trying to win a match, try and place each member in a role where they will succeed.

COMMUNICATION

Communication can help win in a multiplayer game. “Calling Out” the enemy’s location is important for your team. “Calling Out” is simply stating where the enemy is located so that your team will be aware of possible vantage points or areas to bypass. Usually, teams use landmarks on the map, or weapon spawn locations to signal where an enemy is located. So, using these types of identifiers in “Calling Out” can give your team the advantage they may need to win the match.

Being able to direct your team is another aspect of communicating. In objective matches, knowing when to “Push” your opponent is important. “Pushing” is simply continuing to apply pressure to the enemy from your location, such as “Pushing” to grab the flag because they are down two members. “Calling Out” that you have taken down a member will give your team a slight advantage for a few seconds, meaning that your team could “Push” the opponent to apply more pressure. However, when a team is not effectively “Calling Out”, it can limit the team’s ability to “Push” because teammates are walking into multiple enemies alone or facing enemies who currently have a game advantage such as a power weapon. These types of situations can immediately flip the score if the system of “Calling Out” is not adjusted quickly. “Calling Out” can provide your team a constant advantage over your opponent and potentially place your team in the best position to win.

LISTEN TO YOUR TEAM

If you do not listen to your teammates, then the prior information about communication is pointless. Learning to listen can be difficult and confusing at first. Hearing so much information being stated quickly can throw you off of your game. Be calm, and focus on the locations. If you are in a position to help, then take time to put damage into the enemy from your location to support your teammate. If you aren’t in a position to help, then take the information to be aware of where an enemy can potentially be later. Filtering the information will take time to learn, but once you are able to do this, then you will find yourself in great positions because of your teammates.

After you have mastered filtering and listening to your teammates, you will find yourself trusting your teammates. Trusting their information will also take time to build up. It is hard to make a play against the enemy team with only the information you have heard from your team, instead of seeing it with your own eyes. Let’s take a Capture the Flag match as an example. A teammate “Calls Out” the enemy, and tells you to “Push” the flag and grab it because they are down a couple of players. Listening is easy, because you have heard your name and know that your teammate wants you to make the play. However, you cannot see around the corner, and are unsure if the base is actually empty. You will have to trust your teammate’s information. If you are successful, then trusting will be easier the next time. If the information is wrong, then you will become unsuccessful and find yourself not listening to that teammate later. Giving out good information is the most important aspect of being a good teammate.

In the end, doing things that put your team in a position to be successful is what you will want to do. Take the time to find out your strengths and weaknesses. Ask your team for help, and be sure to stay positive when working on their issues, as well as your own. Remember to be concise and to the point with your “Call-Outs,” and to trust your teammates. Trusting your team to do their job will make you a more confident player, which will make you a stronger force to deal with on the virtual battlefield.

Now, if only people really did this.

Solid advice and some very good information.

Don’t grab my Warthog if I’m in the gunner seat, and we’ll get along just fine.

Excellent tips, though most of it is redundant if you don’t have a mic like me (damn it Hax, why?!) - I’m in “Rookie mode” for the time being, though I can still fight to a considerable degree.

Do not kill me for a power weapon and we will be fine.

I get that it’s important to control the power weapons and prevent the enemy team from getting them. However I’m just wondering, does anyone really have time to swap weapons with a teammate that is a better shot with it? Arena is pretty fast paced and in tight quarters, I can see it happening more in WZ or BTB.

By the time I spent time to read the entire thing and grasp what the whole thing is saying, all I had to say was…yes. Everything, just yes. Almost no one follows this (And most of the time I dont either just cause there isnt any point trying since no one else is.) In Arena, everyone is scrambling everywhere just to get their kills going, and in Warzone people just run off to do what they need to, even when other’s are pinging for help or need to capture a point.
The Halo community isnt exactly the best, but if anything…its better than the ones in COD, and thats what matters.

> 2533274795862399;1:
> This Article deserves to be seen. I know this article may be old but new players and existing players can find this useful information by this article via Source: http://rectifygaming.com/becoming-a-better-teammate/ or just Read Below
> I have always enjoyed multiplayer matchmaking video games. Lately, I have been playing a lot of Halo 5: Guardians with my brother and our friends. We are competitive, and we always try to win the match that we get placed in. Sometimes, I place our team in bad situations, simply because I have not done a great job of supporting my team. Team-based games are all about supporting one another to win, much like sports (basketball, football, soccer). Knowing your role, communicating, and listening are important for a team to succeed.
>
> KNOWING YOUR ROLE
> Supporting your team is important for victory, as well as acknowledging your strengths and weaknesses. Compared to your teammates, you will notice that you excel at some aspects of the game, but you fall short at others. Continuing to use Halo as our example, I know that I am the weakest sniper on my team. If we ever battle for the sniper rifle, then I know my role is to support my team in capturing the sniper. If I keep the sniper, then I can improve my overall score, but this is a selfish use of a power weapon. However, I know that passing it off to another member will improve our team score, which will result in our team winning.
> Roles vary between teams. Some teams have a dedicated objective runner, an extremely good slayer, or a great power weapon runner. Rotating roles can be effective if each player is similar in skill. If you are able to do this, or even practice to become better, then definitely do your best to do that. When you are trying to win a match, try and place each member in a role where they will succeed.
>
> COMMUNICATION
> Communication can help win in a multiplayer game. “Calling Out” the enemy’s location is important for your team. “Calling Out” is simply stating where the enemy is located so that your team will be aware of possible vantage points or areas to bypass. Usually, teams use landmarks on the map, or weapon spawn locations to signal where an enemy is located. So, using these types of identifiers in “Calling Out” can give your team the advantage they may need to win the match.
> Being able to direct your team is another aspect of communicating. In objective matches, knowing when to “Push” your opponent is important. “Pushing” is simply continuing to apply pressure to the enemy from your location, such as “Pushing” to grab the flag because they are down two members. “Calling Out” that you have taken down a member will give your team a slight advantage for a few seconds, meaning that your team could “Push” the opponent to apply more pressure. However, when a team is not effectively “Calling Out”, it can limit the team’s ability to “Push” because teammates are walking into multiple enemies alone or facing enemies who currently have a game advantage such as a power weapon. These types of situations can immediately flip the score if the system of “Calling Out” is not adjusted quickly. “Calling Out” can provide your team a constant advantage over your opponent and potentially place your team in the best position to win.
>
> LISTEN TO YOUR TEAM
> If you do not listen to your teammates, then the prior information about communication is pointless. Learning to listen can be difficult and confusing at first. Hearing so much information being stated quickly can throw you off of your game. Be calm, and focus on the locations. If you are in a position to help, then take time to put damage into the enemy from your location to support your teammate. If you aren’t in a position to help, then take the information to be aware of where an enemy can potentially be later. Filtering the information will take time to learn, but once you are able to do this, then you will find yourself in great positions because of your teammates.
> After you have mastered filtering and listening to your teammates, you will find yourself trusting your teammates. Trusting their information will also take time to build up. It is hard to make a play against the enemy team with only the information you have heard from your team, instead of seeing it with your own eyes. Let’s take a Capture the Flag match as an example. A teammate “Calls Out” the enemy, and tells you to “Push” the flag and grab it because they are down a couple of players. Listening is easy, because you have heard your name and know that your teammate wants you to make the play. However, you cannot see around the corner, and are unsure if the base is actually empty. You will have to trust your teammate’s information. If you are successful, then trusting will be easier the next time. If the information is wrong, then you will become unsuccessful and find yourself not listening to that teammate later. Giving out good information is the most important aspect of being a good teammate.
>
> In the end, doing things that put your team in a position to be successful is what you will want to do. Take the time to find out your strengths and weaknesses. Ask your team for help, and be sure to stay positive when working on their issues, as well as your own. Remember to be concise and to the point with your “Call-Outs,” and to trust your teammates. Trusting your team to do their job will make you a more confident player, which will make you a stronger force to deal with on the virtual battlefield.

Thanks for the post. Some really great tips. Hopefully many will see this and apply the tactics.

This would be lovely if it worked. But lets be honest, not many people play for team work these days. Especially, when playing with strangers. I kind of get jealous when I see streamers/pros playing and they’re working as one cohesive unit. But alas, its rare to find people who are actually going to play as a team, nevermind people who are actually on headset. And 90% of the time they’re playing poor music, have their television on too loud or just making noises down the headset :frowning:

Great post. I hope people are reading.

> 2533274810779230;10:
> This would be lovely if it worked. But lets be honest, not many people play for team work these days. Especially, when playing with strangers.

So true, in all aspects. Many people just don’t even care.

> 2533274810779230;10:
> But alas, its rare to find people who are actually going to play as a team, nevermind people who are actually on headset. And 90% of the time they’re playing poor music, have their television on too loud or just making noises down the headset :frowning:

If I hear anyone at all on their headset, I mute the entire server, cause that 90% is more of a 99.5% for me.

Only sometimes I would unmute my mic and ask if people could use their headsets for planning if we are losing by a bit, but even when I do, people either just mute me or don’t even care. However, its like I said…

> 2535462398696491;8:
> The Halo community isnt exactly the best, but if anything…its better than the ones in COD, and thats what matters.

Good article man, I hope new players actually learn this for the future.

> 2535462398696491;8:
> > 2533274810779230;10:
> > This would be lovely if it worked. But lets be honest, not many people play for team work these days. Especially, when playing with strangers. I kind of get jealous when I see streamers/pros playing and they’re working as one cohesive unit. But alas, its rare to find people who are actually going to play as a team, nevermind people who are actually on headset. And 90% of the time they’re playing poor music, have their television on too loud or just making noises down the headset :frowning:
>
> By the time I spent time to read the entire thing and grasp what the whole thing is saying, all I had to say was…yes. Everything, just yes. Almost no one follows this (And most of the time I dont either just cause there isnt any point trying since no one else is.) In Arena, everyone is scrambling everywhere just to get their kills going, and in Warzone people just run off to do what they need to, even when other’s are pinging for help or need to capture a point.
> The Halo community isnt exactly the best, but if anything…its better than the ones in COD, and thats what matters.

This is old thread but I always get bad teammates and I’m a pretty good player but the problem is the power lv player are the ones who run around like idiots the difference between the ranks are as follows
gold, plat , and diamond lv players use little to no teamwork. But the skill gap for an individual is pretty great for each lv While onyx lv player are good at teamwork it then the champs it’s on point know each and every section to help from know how to cover. The reason I lose when I solo que is because I get a lot of diamond and low lv onyx on my team who don’t know how to help they will let you die then push in when they don’t have numbers happens ever time and makes me angry I send them a hateful message because they are stupid and bad but for some strange reason they never push in when they have numbers. But every one has a bad game from time to time Ransoms always seem to lack communication, always dieing, and poor to no teamwork except for high lv onyx lv players

> 2535447612273772;14:
> This is old thread

.

Please don’t revive old topics thanks