Armor Ability Suggestion

Halo 4 should have an item user that uses pick up items like the ones from Halo 3.

Agreed. Halo 4 needs to bring back equipment that was used in Halo 3 rather than Armor Abilities that we used in Reach. I always thought the flow worked better in Reach.

- Jason Garwood

> Agreed. Halo 4 needs to bring back equipment that was used in Halo 3 rather than Armor Abilities that we used in Reach. I always thought the flow worked better in Reach.
>
> - Jason Garwood

i always loved deploying bubble shields in H3

even though i’m not good at placing them

Yeah, what if they use this! idea. And equipment?

You mean equipment?

I would rather not have equipment return. Although it added a cool change to gameplay, I think the equipment was pretty useless. There were too many time in halo 3 when I was waiting the perfect time to use my equipment, and then I would die with it still unused in my inventory. Personally I liked armor abilities better, but they could also use some tweaking.

> I would rather not have equipment return. Although it added a cool change to gameplay, I think the equipment was pretty useless. There were too many time in halo 3 when I was waiting the perfect time to use my equipment, and then I would die with it still unused in my inventory. Personally I liked armor abilities better, but they could also use some tweaking.

Thus why Bungie changed Equipment to Armor Abilities.

There are problems with both though. Either you always wanted to save it for the perfect moment or they intruded to greatly into the multiplayer experience. Instead for H4 343 should strike a middle ground between the two.

Make this next set of Power Ups map based like Equipment with multiple but limited number of uses.

And while we are at it, fix the problem that both Equipment and AAs had: Being unable to know what your opponent has on them. Drastically alter the player profile when they pick up the item so that players immediately know what they have from any angle.

No I meant item user as a armor ability.

> No I meant item user as a armor ability.

… so AAs, but they spawn on the map?

I’d rather see equipment and AAs out of Halo 4.

> I’d rather see equipment and AAs out of Halo 4.

Why?

Equipment and AAs add tangible benefits to the game. Their respective faults bring them down but they do benefit the game by giving players more control over when they can use their Power Ups and by adding more variety.

I’m thinking they could combine the two.

Add some of the equpiment from Halo 3 in, AND

  • Add a jetpack equpiment, for one time use

  • Having the capability to sprint, all the time (because that would be realistic)

That’s just my opinion, but knowing how Halo works, there will be a completely new system of equipment, or something like it.

> - Having the capability to sprint, all the time (because that would be realistic)

Ya! I get to use this quote:

> "With the addition of AA’s to Halo Reach, MLG has struggled to incorporate them into their settings simply due to how they operate and how they affect the game. Eventually, Sprint became the sole loadout AA, with the others on the maps as pickups… all was as good as it can be with Reach. However, with the advent of the no-bloom TU and its implications going forward, we must re-examine the use of Sprint and its affect on the game.
> There is nothing inherently wrong with sprint; it’s an incredibly necessary and beneficial feature for some games. However, due to the slower killing speeds and movement speeds of Halo games, as well as the multiple respawns per player, Sprint can actually become a hindrance to the flow and pacing of the game.
> It’s not enough to simply say, “Players can escape from bad decisions when they otherwise shouldn’t,” because as soon as we added sprint to the game, it no longer became a bad decision. However, while that’s not a good reason to remove sprint, it’s in no way a defense of sprint either.
> Before I get into sprint itself, I’d like to briefly touch on why maps are designed in certain ways. The relative ranges of the weapons in the sandbox and player movement options dictate the proper spacing of elements in a map. The distance between doorways, the amount of open space you have, the cover-to-cover distance, is all designed around how a player moves and how the weapons interact. Halo gameplay, as it has always done, functions best on medium to small maps with a good combination of open space and covered areas. Successful players learn the maps and how other players move about them to accurately predict and anticipate their movements. This lends a sense of pacing and order, which is instrumental in facilitating and rewarding well-conceived strategy and actions.
> The ability of players to accurately anticipate where other players are going to be on the map based on their knowledge and experience is of paramount importance for a balanced Halo game. Sprint drastically affects this skill, making it far less predictable and far less reliable when planning your actions.
> This can be illustrated on a small scale with a 1 on 1 encounter. When one player disengages and retreats to cover, there is a switch that goes off in the attacking player’s mind which begins a process of elimination and prediction. Good players will usually be able to predict where the enemy is retreating to and select the most effective route to cut off their retreat and finish the kill. On the other side of the spectrum, the retreating player can anticipate (based on how experienced they think their pursuer is) where the attacker is going to move and create a counter attack or a different retreat pattern. And thus a game of chess is played with each engagement that doesn’t immediately end; each player using their map knowledge and anticipation to outwit the other. All of this happens very quickly; within the span of a few seconds. The very integrity of individual battles rests on the fact that players can only move in certain ways to certain locations within a specific time frame.
> When sprint is added to the equation, this process becomes obfuscated and muddled. Many would argue that this simply raises the level of knowledge and prediction required to close out an encounter, but that’s simply not the case. The issue is that the geometry of the maps, out of necessity, must be designed primarily around standard movement. What this means is that the delicate balance between cover-to-cover distance, escape routes and angles of attack is completely obliterated in almost every situation when Sprint is in play. Even if an attacking player accurately predicts where the escaping player is retreating to, sprint makes it so that the attacker will never have a chance to act on that advantage.
> Under normal movement conditions, the escaping player will need to react based on the possible angles of the attacking player and where they are located on the map. Sometimes, the best play will be to mount a surprise counterattack, fake one direction and go the other, sit and wait, or sometimes the best solution will be to just run to the nearest cover and escape. Additionally, the attacking player can force the retreating player to engage by cutting off their escape routes. All of these different options are playing out in each players mind, forcing them to make a decision and act on it. With sprint, the most viable and intelligent solution to every engagement where you are at a disadvantage is to run. There’s little the attacking player can do about it. The mind battle between the two players for positioning is completely thrown out the window.
> This issue also presents itself in the more complicated realm of a 2v2 or 4v4 team game. Even if two or more players are not directly engaged, they each are predicting where the other players are and where they could be within a certain time-frame. This allows players with greater map knowledge and quicker wits to gain a significant advantage. However, like in the 1v1 example, Sprint runs roughshod over any intelligent predications or quick-thinking reactions.
> While it’s true that Sprint does not completely eliminate this essential mental aspect, it does make it less reliable and rewarding without providing any tangible benefit to the game in return. What used to be a battle of mind, map knowledge, and execution simply becomes a battle to finish off an opponent desperately sprinting out of reach. "

AA as pickups.

I JUST BLEW YOUR MIND.

(mlg)

No AA’s! The equipment was fun though.

No, Armor Abilities in Halo 4. They’re pointless and don’t make any sense appearing in Halo 4 when they only appeared in a prequel.