Aim Acceleration Makes Halo Unplayable

A few months ago a friend of mine let me borrow his Xbox along with Halo Reach. I was looking for a fun, competitive, and skillful shooter to play and Halo, with its high player health and lack of perks, killstreaks, etc looked like a great choice for this. The game had some pretty good content, but one thing really broke the game for me.

Aim acceleration.

Upon some internet searches, I learned that this was also called “aim smoothing” by the Halo community. I learned it wasn’t present in Halo 1 and 2 and was surprised that the issue wasn’t addressed after Halo 3 even with all the criticism and resentment I found towards it from the Halo community. Aim smoothing is what causes your camera to move slowly at first when you quickly flick your analog stick to one side, and slowly build up speed as you continue holding it to the side. This is a big problem because more serious or competitive gamers like a 1 to 1 ratio of analog stick movement to camera movement so the controls feel responsive and they can snap on target quickly. It was extremely frustrating trying to get on target with the aim acceleration. It felt like I was fighting the camera mechanics or was trying to swing my weapon through water. In the end, I decided this feature was game-breaking and not worth my time trying to get used to. I quit playing after a couple days and returned my friend’s Xbox.

All I ask for is either the removal or significant reduction of the amount of aim acceleration in Halo 4, or at least an option to toggle it on or off.

Another issue I found with the game was the extremely strong aim assist. However, I think the only reason the aim assist in Halo is so strong is because of the aim acceleration. If the camera speed was made more responsive by removing the aim acceleration, aim assist wouldn’t need to be as strong as it would be much easier for players to stay on target.

I make this post because aim acceleration in modern Halo games is the sole reason I haven’t bought an Xbox. If the aim smoothing issue was addressed in the next Halo, I would buy an Xbox just to play Halo 4.

> I make this post because aim acceleration in modern Halo games is the sole reason I haven’t bought an Xbox.

There’s plenty of other (more legitimate) reasons to own an Xbox, my friend. One small element in a single game isn’t worth writing off a console.

I know how you feel. I hate when im trying to aim but then it will move slightly to another target all by it self.

> > I make this post because aim acceleration in modern Halo games is the sole reason I haven’t bought an Xbox.
>
> There’s plenty of other (more legitimate) reasons to own an Xbox, my friend. One small element in a single game isn’t worth writing off a console.

I already own a Playstation so I more or less already have everything I could get from an Xbox. The only reason I would buy one at this point is if there was an Xbox exclusive game that I really enjoy. I thought Halo was going to be this game and I was about to make the move to buy a 360 too, just to play Halo, until I actually played the game on my friend’s Xbox. The aim mechanics was a total turn off…

> > > I make this post because aim acceleration in modern Halo games is the sole reason I haven’t bought an Xbox.
> >
> > There’s plenty of other (more legitimate) reasons to own an Xbox, my friend. One small element in a single game isn’t worth writing off a console.
>
> I already own a Playstation so I more or less already have everything I could get from an Xbox. The only reason I would buy one at this point is if there was an Xbox exclusive game that I really enjoyed. I thought Halo was going to be this game and I was about to make the move to buy a 360 too, just to play Halo, until I actually played the game on my friend’s Xbox. The camera mechanics was a total turn off…

hmm, have you tried Gears of War?

> > I make this post because aim acceleration in modern Halo games is the sole reason I haven’t bought an Xbox.
>
> There’s plenty of other (more legitimate) reasons to own an Xbox, my friend. One small element in a single game isn’t worth writing off a console.

Nor if it is indeed an issue, is it something you can’t adapt to. Quite frankly I haven’t noticed any aim acceleration in Halo Reach because compared to Section 8 Prejudice it’s an absolutely trivial amount. Yet I can play the two in concert because I, as a human, can easily adapt to the very different control schemes and aiming mechanics. This isn’t any form of science, you don’t need to propose, fund, and write new thesis papers whenever you pop the disc out of the tray. You simply pick up the controller and adapt to it. Granted there’s the point of “constructive criticism” if too many needless barriers exist to that adaptation, but to be honest it doesn’t look like the OP is even trying.

As for aim assist, that’s how console games work. You don’t have the precision of a mouse so you need other ways to compensate to make the game playable given the format. Every game has it to some degree, so OP please do some homework because as it seems you’re simply entering a new genre of gaming and complaining about how it’s unfamiliar to you. Give it some time, then whine because there is certainly a lot to whine about in Halo Reach (really, don’t play it. It’s an incredibly poor ambassador for the system) but for much, much, much greater concerns than these teething issues (-Yoink- balance, crap levels, bad writing, ugly environments, terrible AI, ect.)

> I already own a Playstation so I more or less already have everything I could get from an Xbox. The only reason I would buy one at this point is if there was an Xbox exclusive game that I really enjoy. I thought Halo was going to be this game and I was about to make the move to buy a 360 too, just to play Halo, until I actually played the game on my friend’s Xbox. The aim mechanics was a total turn off…

Might I suggest trying Halo 3, Halo 3:ODST, or any of the Gears of War? There’s a TON of Xbox exclusive titles that are a joy to play, especially FPS’s. Reach isn’t Halo’s shining moment by a long shot, however if Halo 4 doesn’t make you want an Xbox, then I’ll be -Yoink!-.

> > > I make this post because aim acceleration in modern Halo games is the sole reason I haven’t bought an Xbox.
> >
> > There’s plenty of other (more legitimate) reasons to own an Xbox, my friend. One small element in a single game isn’t worth writing off a console.
>
> Nor if it is indeed an issue, is it something you can’t adapt to. Quite frankly I haven’t noticed any aim acceleration in Halo Reach because compared to Section 8 Prejudice it’s an absolutely trivial amount. Yet I can play the two in concert because I, as a human, can easily adapt to the very different control schemes and aiming mechanics. This isn’t any form of science, you don’t need to propose, fund, and write new thesis papers whenever you pop the disc out of the tray. You simply pick up the controller and adapt to it. Granted there’s the point of “constructive criticism” if too many needless barriers exist to that adaptation, but to be honest it doesn’t look like the OP is even trying.
>
> As for aim assist, that’s how console games work. You don’t have the precision of a mouse so you need other ways to compensate to make the game playable given the format. Every game has it to some degree, so OP please do some homework because as it seems you’re simply entering a new genre of gaming and complaining about how it’s unfamiliar to you.

I’ve played a wide variety of console shooters, from COD to Killzone to Socom, for years. Halo definitely does the most hand-holding out of all of them, even more so than COD. It’s one of the few shooters I’ve played that has strong “lock-on” aim assist online and the only game I’ve felt more sluggish and slow in than Halo is Killzone 2 (though the sluggishness worked well with the atmosphere of KZ, in Halo it doesn’t feel like it belongs in the game…).

I’m not saying this game is BS and doesn’t take any skill to play, if anyone is taking it that way. The only reason there’s so much hand holding is to “balance out” the high player health so that the noobs don’t get destroyed…

I disagree with you. One mechanic doesn’t make a game unplayable. Give Halo 4 a try, in my opinion you will be throwing your money at 343i once you try it :stuck_out_tongue:

> I’ve played a wide variety of console shooters, from COD to Killzone to Socom, for years. Halo definitely most hand-holding out of all of them, even more so than COD. It’s one of the few shooters I’ve played that has strong “lock-on” aim assist online and the only game I’ve felt more sluggish and slow in than Halo is Killzone 2 (though the sluggishness worked well with the atmosphere of KZ, in Halo it doesn’t feel like it belongs in the game…).

Well then just take the point that it’s a crap game. Halos 2, 3, and ODST certainly weren’t sluggish for this genre of FPS and aim assist may not feel as strong with the weapons featured in that game (though I’m still not convinced it’s a serious issue in Reach based on my time with it.)

However more generally there might be an issue for you with Halo’s health mechanics which I don’t think compare well with anything on the PS3 (at least in the exclusive category or military shooters.) On that point, I still say give it more time, learn the game before judging it too harshly (it’s a big jump after all), but please do so in a stronger representative of both the xbox and Halo (Halo 3, Halo 3 ODST, Halo Combat Evolved Anniversary, pretty much anything besides Reach.)

> > I’ve played a wide variety of console shooters, from COD to Killzone to Socom, for years. Halo definitely most hand-holding out of all of them, even more so than COD. It’s one of the few shooters I’ve played that has strong “lock-on” aim assist online and the only game I’ve felt more sluggish and slow in than Halo is Killzone 2 (though the sluggishness worked well with the atmosphere of KZ, in Halo it doesn’t feel like it belongs in the game…).
>
> Well then just take the point that it’s a crap game. Halos 2, 3, and ODST certainly weren’t sluggish for this genre of FPS and aim assist may not feel as strong with the weapons featured in that game (though I’m still not convinced it’s a serious issue in Reach based on my time with it.)
>
> However more generally there might be an issue for you with Halo’s health mechanics which I don’t think compare well with anything on the PS3 (at least in the exclusive category or military shooters.) On that point, I still say give it more time, learn the game before judging it too harshly (it’s a big jump after all), but please do so in a stronger representative of both the xbox and Halo (Halo 3, Halo 3 ODST, Halo Combat Evolved Anniversary, pretty much anything besides Reach.)

Halo isn’t a crap game. From what I’ve seen it does a lot of things right and I have high hopes for Halo 4, but none of the content matters if one of the most important aspects of the game, the camera mechanics, is broken. It’s not some special feature of Halo that I should get used to, it’s simply broken and doesn’t belong in a supposedly competitive, AAA shooter. It could be a good way to pass time every once in a while, but I want a game that I’ll play long term.

Nothing in Halo is new to me by the way…

My reaction to anyone claiming Aim Accelleration is a big deal:

“Well if you want quicker, more reflexive controls, just turn up your look sensitivity, duh.”

The fact is, if you are a twitch-based player, use higher sensitivity so your low-aim sensitivity before acceleration is high. All of a sudden your problem disappears.

> My reaction to anyone claiming Aim Accelleration is a big deal:
>
> “Well if you want quicker, more reflexive controls, just turn up your look sensitivity, duh.”
>
> The fact is, if you are a twitch-based player, use higher sensitivity so your low-aim sensitivity before acceleration is high. All of a sudden your problem disappears.

Not sure if this post is supposed to be sarcasm…

So I should turn my sensitivity all the way up and flick my analog stick in quick, short bursts just to bypass aim acceleration in Halo…

Pro-tip: Increase your look sensitivity you silly goose!

I don’t think it is a big deal, Mr. Has-no-xbox-therefore-no-halo.

It shouldn’t take more than 5 minutes for 343 to add an aim acceleration toggle on/off option for those who do think it’s a big deal.

> > My reaction to anyone claiming Aim Accelleration is a big deal:
> >
> > “Well if you want quicker, more reflexive controls, just turn up your look sensitivity, duh.”
> >
> > The fact is, if you are a twitch-based player, use higher sensitivity so your low-aim sensitivity before acceleration is high. All of a sudden your problem disappears.
>
> Not sure if this post is supposed to be sarcasm…
>
> So I should turn my sensitivity all the way up and flick my analog stick in quick, short bursts just to bypass aim acceleration in Halo…

If you really find aim acceleration to be game-breaking for you, I pity you. I’m pretty sure you’re making a big deal out of nothing. Maybe you have crazy sensitive “reflexes” or something that most everybody else does not have…but I’ve never heard of the aim-acceleration ruining gameplay…I’ve never really even noticed it.

If I’m understanding you correctly, you don’t like how - when you are trying to turn your character around - your view starts out moving “slow” and then starts to move faster…

As suggested, if you increase you look sensitivity, you will not have to make such large inputs into the joystick in order to turn around, and thus, aim acceleration will be less “severe.” From my understanding, and experience, if you are aiming at a target you will not be moving the joystick far enough in any direction for aim acceleration to come into play…and if you do find aim acceleration to be “getting in the way” of your aiming, I think that has more to do with bad aim than a poor mechanic.

> My reaction to anyone claiming Aim Accelleration is a big deal:
>
> “Well if you want quicker, more reflexive controls, just turn up your look sensitivity, duh.”
>
> The fact is, if you are a twitch-based player, use higher sensitivity so your low-aim sensitivity before acceleration is high. All of a sudden your problem disappears.

The problem is, it really doesn’t work that way. Aim acceleration still takes effect at max sensitivity. In fact, the effect is much more severe as unlike on lower sensitivities, the aim tends to jump on higher sensitivities.

In fact, I’d say that anyone who says anything about aim acceleration should at first understand what it is and why it is there. It’s not an algorithm meant to make yor life harder. It’s an algorithm made to compensate for input lag, lag that comes from your TV plus the game processing your inputs which (in terms of Halo) translates to around 150-180 milliseconds on a regular HDTV and over 200 ms on a bad one. Aim acceleration simply tries to make the delay seem natural by accelerating your reticle instead of automatically transferring it to full speed.

The reason CoD has so smooth aim is the faster refresh rate. Doubling the refresh rate means halving the input lag produced by the game (NOTE: it has no effect on the input lag produced by the TV). Halo runs at 30 Hz, that means a minimum input lag of 100 ms. CoD runs at 60 Hz which means 50 ms for input lag.

If you are really having problems with the input lag, I propose trying to take the input lag produced by your TV to minimum. For such a TV, the best one is Sony 32W400 with an input lag of about 8.6 ms. You should also consider a computer monitor as they are usually even faster, Dell S2330MX being the fastest with 3.8 ms of input lag. Alternatively, you can go with an old CRT TV as they have an input lag of <1 ms which is practically non-existant. More low-input lag monitors and TVs can be found here. Buying a better display won’t be an absolute fix, but will significantly lessen the lag.

> > > My reaction to anyone claiming Aim Accelleration is a big deal:
> > >
> > > “Well if you want quicker, more reflexive controls, just turn up your look sensitivity, duh.”
> > >
> > > The fact is, if you are a twitch-based player, use higher sensitivity so your low-aim sensitivity before acceleration is high. All of a sudden your problem disappears.
> >
> > Not sure if this post is supposed to be sarcasm…
> >
> > So I should turn my sensitivity all the way up and flick my analog stick in quick, short bursts just to bypass aim acceleration in Halo…
>
> If you really find aim acceleration to be game-breaking for you, I pity you. I’m pretty sure you’re making a big deal out of nothing. Maybe you have crazy sensitive “reflexes” or something that most everybody else does not have…but I’ve never heard of the aim-acceleration ruining gameplay…I’ve never really even noticed it.
>
> If I’m understanding you correctly, you don’t like how - when you are trying to turn your character around - your view starts out moving “slow” and then starts to move faster…
>
> As suggested, if you increase you look sensitivity, you will not have to make such large inputs into the joystick in order to turn around, and thus, aim acceleration will be less “severe.” From my understanding, and experience, if you are aiming at a target you will not be moving the joystick far enough in any direction for aim acceleration to come into play…and if you do find aim acceleration to be “getting in the way” of your aiming, I think that has more to do with bad aim than a poor mechanic.

I do have crazy sensitive reflexes that most everybody else does not have.

The speed at which my camera moves is not the problem. The inconsistency between camera movement speed and analog stick movement is the problem.

> > My reaction to anyone claiming Aim Accelleration is a big deal:
> >
> > “Well if you want quicker, more reflexive controls, just turn up your look sensitivity, duh.”
> >
> > The fact is, if you are a twitch-based player, use higher sensitivity so your low-aim sensitivity before acceleration is high. All of a sudden your problem disappears.
>
> The problem is, it really doesn’t work that way. Aim acceleration still takes effect at max sensitivity. In fact, the effect is much more severe as unlike on lower sensitivities, the aim tends to jump on higher sensitivities.
>
> In fact, I’d say that anyone who says anything about aim acceleration should at first understand what it is and why it is there. It’s not an algorithm meant to make yor life harder. It’s an algorithm made to compensate for input lag, lag that comes from your TV plus the game processing your inputs which (in terms of Halo) translates to around 150-180 milliseconds on a regular HDTV and over 200 ms on a bad one. Aim acceleration simply tries to make the delay seem natural by accelerating your reticle instead of automatically transferring it to full speed.
>
> The reason CoD has so smooth aim is the faster refresh rate. Doubling the refresh rate means halving the input lag produced by the game (NOTE: it has no effect on the input lag produced by the TV). Halo runs at 30 Hz, that means a minimum input lag of 100 ms. CoD runs at 60 Hz which means 50 ms for input lag.
>
> If you are really having problems with the input lag, I propose trying to take the input lag produced by your TV to minimum. For such a TV, the best one is Sony 32W400 with an input lag of about 8.6 ms. You should also consider a computer monitor as they are usually even faster, Dell S2330MX being the fastest with 3.8 ms of input lag. Alternatively, you can go with an old CRT TV as they have an input lag of <1 ms which is practically non-existant. More low-input lag monitors and TVs can be found here. Buying a better display won’t be an absolute fix, but will significantly lessen the lag.

Killzone games run at 30 FPS and the aim acceleration in those games is not even comparable to what Halo is afflicted with. Killzone 3 plays nearly identically to Call of Duty.

I’ll also add that whatever screen you are using to play on might have contributed to that “felt like moving through water” feeling. The input lag on many television sets can really “muddy” your inputs to the controller and what is displayed on screen.

If you were playing on an LCD, that was probably the culprit. Even plasmas suffer input lag. I would suggest, if you haven’t had the experience, to find or purchase a computer monitor with <5ms response time…then set your look sensitivity to ~5. If you still honestly think aim acceleration is messing with your aim then I don’t know what to tell ya…it might just be in your head.